Johns Hopkins University: Student Punished for Party Invitation

Category: Free Speech
Schools: Johns Hopkins University

Johns Hopkins University earned its Red Alert designation by suspending18 -year-old junior Justin Park for posting an “offensive” Halloween party invitation on Facebook. Because some found the invitation racially offensive, Park was charged with and found guilty of “harassment,” “intimidation,” and “failing to respect the rights of others.” Although it was later reduced in the face of public pressure, Park’s original punishment included suspension from the university for a year, completion of 300 hours of community service, an assignment to read 12 books and to write a reflection paper on each, and mandatory attendance at a workshop on diversity and race relations. Johns Hopkins President William Brody made matters worse shortly after Park’s suspension by introducing a new and chillingly broad “civility” code prohibiting “rude, disrespectful behavior” at the university, and by stating in an article in The JHU Gazette that speech that is “tasteless” or that breaches standards of “civility” will not be allowed.














    • Looking back at a crisis, one year later

      November 2, 2007

      One year later, few substantive changes have been made within the University in response to the controversial Halloween in the ‘Hood party. “Many of my constituents are upset Justin Park is back on campus,” Black Student Union President Brenton Pennicooke said in reference to the ex-Sigma Chi brother who orchestrated the event. “Some feel he got off too easy. We understand he didn’t serve his full time, and some of us are upset.” In December, Park’s sentence was “substantially reduced” according to a press release by the Foundation for Individual Rights in Education (FIRE), which advocated for Park during his […]

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    • Campus Alert: Hassled at Hopkins

      June 18, 2007

      No school demonstrated greater contempt for the rights of its students this past school year than Johns Hopkins University. In fact, Johns Hopkins nearly destroyed the academic career of one student this past fall—and all because of the student’s constitutionally protected speech on an outside Web site. In November, Johns Hopkins suspended 18-year-old Korean-American junior Justin Park for a year, requiring him to complete 300 hours of community service, attend a diversity workshop and read 12 books, writing a paper on each—all before being eligible for readmission. His crime? Posting an invitation for a “Halloween in the Hood” fraternity party […]

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    • Facing off over Facebook

      February 21, 2007

      Students, be warned: the college of your choice may be watching you, and will more than likely be keeping an eye on you once you enter the hallowed campus gates. America’s institutions of higher education are increasingly monitoring students’ activity online and scrutinizing profiles, not only for illegal behavior, but also for what they deem to be inappropriate speech. Contrary to popular misconceptions, the speech codes, censorship, and double standards of the culture-wars heyday of the ’80s and ’90s are alive and kicking, and they are now colliding with the latest explosion of communication technology. Sites like Facebook and MySpace are becoming the largest […]

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    • Johns Hopkins’ 1st Amendment

      January 12, 2007

      Imagine for a moment the following scenario. You organize a party and invite all your friends. Then you receive notice from your school’s administration that some people found the theme of the party offensive and ordered you to remove advertisements for it. You complied, but held the party anyway. Then a few days later you were informed that the party was in violation of university policy and you would be facing disciplinary action. This might sound a bit far-fetched, but it is exactly what happened to Johns Hopkins University student Justin Park. His original punishment for the “Halloween in the […]

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    • Johns Hopkins student appeals punishment for Facebook advertisement

      January 11, 2007

      A Johns Hopkins University student who was punished for an allegedly offensive advertisement he placed on the social networking Web site Facebook.com has had his sentence reduced after an appeal. Advocacy group Foundation for Individual Rights in Education announced this month that Justin Park, the social chair of the local Sigma Chi fraternity chapter, was “satisfied with the results” of the appeal but wanted to keep the specific details of the appeal private. In October, Park posted an advertisement on the social networking Web site Facebook.com for Sigma Chi’s “Halloween in the Hood” party. An administrator from the university’s Greek […]

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    • Hopkins cuts punishment for student over ‘Hood’ Halloween party

      January 9, 2007

      A nonprofit free speech group says a Johns Hopkins University student who was suspended for a year for writing an invitation to a fraternity “Halloween in the Hood” party has had his punishment reduced after an appeal. The Foundation for Individual Rights in Education has been advocating on behalf of Justin Park, who posted the invitation on the Web site Facebook. The posting described Baltimore as an “H-I-V pit” and urged guests to wear “bling bling ice ice, grills” and “hoochie hoops.” A skeleton pirate with dreadlocks hanging from a noose was used as decoration at the Sigma Chi fraternity […]

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    • Penalty reduced over ‘hood’ party

      January 9, 2007

      Johns Hopkins University officials have substantially reduced the punishment of a student suspended for posting online a “Halloween in the Hood” fraternity party invitation, according to an education foundation group that protested the university’s actions. The Philadelphia-based Foundation for Individual Rights in Education said yesterday that Justin H. Park, a junior and former Sigma Chi fraternity member, contacted it with the results of the appeal. According to Greg Lukianoff, president of FIRE, Park said that he was satisfied with the outcome but wanted it to remain private. “It’s a substantial change,” said Lukianoff. “But the fact that there’s any punishment […]

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    • Hopkins cuts punishment in party case

      January 9, 2007

      Johns Hopkins University has reduced the punishment of a student who was suspended for a role in a Halloween party for which some materials featured images viewed as promoting racial stereotypes. The Foundation for Individual Rights in Education announced that Justin Park’s punishment had been reduced, but declined to offer specifics, citing Park’s request for privacy. FIRE indicated that it remains concerned about the incident— in which some minority students have accused the university of not doing enough to create a welcoming environment and in which FIRE and others have said that the university was being politically correct and squelching […]

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    • Campus thought police

      December 8, 2006

      On October 26, Johns Hopkins University student Justin Park posted a politically incorrect flyer on the popular social-networking site Facebook.com. Today Park finds himself at the center of a brewing controversy that pits parody against a university regime bent on stamping out discourteous expression — even if it means trampling on students’ rights. Park’s flyer promoted an upcoming Halloween party held at his off-campus fraternity under the theme “Halloween in the Hood.” Inspired by the so-called “Pimps and Hoes Party,” a popular event you can find on virtually any major campus, the flyer used provocative “gangsta” talk to describe the […]

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    • Johns Hopkins suspends student for Facebook Halloween party advertisement

      December 6, 2006

      Advocates are calling the suspension of Johns Hopkins University student Justin Park a serious threat to students’ rights after he was disciplined for posting a controversial Halloween party advertisement online. Last month, Park posted an advertisement on the social networking Web site Facebook.com for the Sigma Chi fraternity’s “Halloween in the Hood” party. An administrator from the university’s Greek Affairs office asked Park to remove the posting after several students said it was offensive. Park complied, but later put up another ad after receiving inquiries whether the party would still take place, Foundation for Individual Rights in Education Director of […]

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    • Conduct unbecoming

      December 3, 2006

      The indomitable Foundation for Individual Rights in Education reports that a student at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Md. has been suspended for a year for posting Halloween party invitations on facebook.com that some on campus found offensive. The university found 18-year-old junior Justin Park guilty of failing to respect the rights of others, harassment, and intimidation for posting ads for a fraternity’s “Halloween in the Hood” party that contained “offensive racial stereotyping.” He was also charged with “failing to respect the rights of others” and engaging in “conduct or a pattern of conduct that harasses a person or group.” […]

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    • Hopkins student appeals suspension for offensive Web posting

      December 1, 2006

      BALTIMORE – The Johns Hopkins University student suspended for a year after posting a racially tinged Halloween party invitation on the Web site Facebook.com is appealing the ruling today with the school’s dean of student life, Susan Boswell. The university’s student review board, made up of three students and two faculty members, found 18-year-old junior Justin Park guilty of failing to respect the rights of others, harassment and intimidation. Park then sought help from the Foundation for Individual Rights in Education, the pro-free speech organization said Thursday in a written statement. According a news release by FIRE, Park currently faces […]

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    • Student expelled for year for invitation

      December 1, 2006

      BALTIMORE, Dec. 1 (UPI) — A student at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore has been suspended for a year for a racially offensive fraternity party invitation that was posted online. Justin Park, an 18-year-old freshman, is banned from the school’s campus until January 2008, the Foundation for Individual Rights in Education said. He must perform 300 hours of community service, and read and write reports on 12 books. About 30 students protested the punishment earlier this week, the Baltimore Sun reported. “This is a violation of the university’s moral right for free speech on campus,” Lars Trautman, a junior, told […]

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    • Free speech and punishment at Hopkins

      December 1, 2006

      Johns Hopkins University students are protesting once again about Justin Park — but this time it’s on his behalf. Park was the Hopkins junior who posted Facebook invitations to Sigma Chi’s “Halloween in the Hood” party, which prompted protests from black students who accused him and the fraternity of racial insensitivity. Last week, the university’s Student Conduct Board suspended him until the spring of 2008, drawing criticism that the punishment was excessive and that Hopkins may be ignoring its student policy designed to “protect the university as a forum for the free expression of ideas.” Park is still attending classes […]

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    • Race debate shifts to free speech

      November 30, 2006

      A campus debate over race relations is evolving into one on free speech as a group of Johns Hopkins University students protested yesterday what they believe is the school’s excessive punishment of a student for posting a “Halloween in the Hood” party invitation online. The students, who have launched a Web site and petition drive in support of suspended junior Justin H. Park, say the university is caving in to public pressure to protect its image, rather than protecting one of its own. “This is a violation of the school’s moral obligation for free speech on campus,” said Lars Trautman, […]

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    • Still Looking for a New Year’s Resolution, Red Alert Schools?

      January 14, 2010

      Here’s an easy New Year’s resolution that Brandeis University, Bucknell University, Colorado College, Johns Hopkins University, Michigan State University, and Tufts University can make: get off of FIRE’s Red Alert list of America’s worst violators of campus liberty! This week, FIRE sent the presidents of each of the six Red Alert schools a letter reminding them of their schools’ serious and ongoing violations of student and faculty rights, and just how easy it is for each of them to remedy their mistakes and reaffirm their commitment to freedom of expression. FIRE also included with each letter a copy of the […]

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    • FIRE 2010 U.S. News Letter to JHU President Daniels

      January 7, 2010

      January 7, 2010 President Ronald J. Daniels Office of the President The Johns Hopkins University 3400 N. Charles Street Baltimore, Maryland 21218 Re: Johns Hopkins University and FIRE’s Red Alert list Dear President Daniels: I am writing to draw your attention to the full-page advertisement that FIRE ran in the most recent “America’s Best Colleges” issue of U.S. News & World Report. The advertisement appears on page 89, immediately adjacent to the rankings of the top 100 national universities, in the same position our advertisement appeared last year. We have enclosed a copy of the issue for your information. As […]

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    • How Can Johns Hopkins University Get Off FIRE’s Red Alert List?

      September 4, 2009

      Following up on FIRE’s full-page ad in U.S. News & World Report‘s “America’s Best Colleges” issue, released nationwide last week, we have been explaining why each of our six Red Alert schools has been named among the worst of the worst when it comes to individual rights on campus—and what each school can do to get off the list. So far, we have outlined the cases at Brandeis University, Colorado College, Michigan State University, and Tufts University. Today, we turn our attention to Johns Hopkins University, where FIRE has placed an advertisement in its student newspaper, The Johns Hopkins News-Letter. […]

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    • This Month in FIRE History: Johns Hopkins Suspends Student for One Year for ‘Offensive’ Halloween Invitation

      November 17, 2008

      Few schools have been more stubborn about censoring free expression than Johns Hopkins University (JHU). JHU is on our Red Alert list for being among the “worst of the worst” when it comes to violating individual rights on campus—and the university earned this ignominious distinction in November of 2006 in one of the most egregious cases we have ever seen. The incident began with an invitation posted by student Justin Park on Facebook.com for a fraternity costume party dubbed “Halloween in the Hood.” When complaints about the invitation surfaced, the Director of Greek Affairs asked Park to remove the invitation. […]

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    • How Can Johns Hopkins University Get Off FIRE’s Red Alert List?

      August 29, 2008

      Following up on FIRE’s full-page ad in U.S. News & World Report‘s “America’s Best Colleges” issue, released nationwide this week, we have been explaining why each of our five Red Alert schools has been named the worst of the worst when it comes to individual rights on campus—and what each school can do to get off the list. So far, we have outlined the cases at Tufts University, Colorado College, Brandeis University, and Valdosta State University. What can Johns Hopkins University (Hopkins) do to get off FIRE’s Red Alert list? Hopkins earned its Red Alert designation by suspending eighteen-year-old junior […]

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    • FIRE Exposes Unrepentant Abusers of Liberty in ‘U.S. News’ College Rankings Issue

      August 25, 2008

      PHILADELPHIA, August 25, 2008—The 2009 edition of U.S. News and World Report‘s America’s Best Colleges issue, released today, includes a full-page advertisement from FIRE highlighting the five colleges and universities that have earned FIRE’s Red Alert distinction for being the “worst of the worst” when it comes to liberty on campus. Students should think twice before choosing to attend Red Alert schools, which include Brandeis University, Colorado College, Johns Hopkins University, Tufts University, and Valdosta State University. “Every year, millions of students and parents turn to U.S. News and World Report to see the latest college rankings,” said FIRE President […]

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    • Johns Hopkins Still Under Fire

      January 12, 2007

      Even though Johns Hopkins University reduced Justin Park’s punishment and he now considers the matter resolved, the university is still taking hits in the press. Today, the Indiana Daily Student published an opinion piece criticizing Hopkins for ignoring the free speech rights of its students. Columnist Edward Delp discussed the Hopkins case and other similar incidents at neighboring schools by using FIRE’s Spotlight as a resource. He concluded by stating exactly why freedom of speech on college campuses is so important: Institutions of higher education are supposed to promote the free exchange of ideas, but nowadays there seems to be […]

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    • Media Coverage of Johns Hopkins ‘Hood’ Party Continues

      January 9, 2007

      The decision by Johns Hopkins University (JHU) to reduce the punishment of student Justin Park is receiving attention from national and local media. Articles from the Associated Press, The Baltimore Sun, and Inside Higher Ed discuss FIRE’s efforts in this case, as well as our remaining concerns about students’ rights on the JHU campus. As FIRE President Greg Lukianoff told The Baltimore Sun regarding Park’s decreased reprimand, “It’s a substantial change, but the fact that there’s any punishment at all, we oppose.” JHU’s actions this year in Park’s case and the attempts at censorship of The Carrollton Record, a conservative […]

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    • Johns Hopkins Resolves Facebook Case; Becomes FIRE’s First-Ever ‘Censor of the Year’

      January 8, 2007

      Today’s press release announces that Johns Hopkins University has reached a final decision in its case against Justin Park, the 18-year-old junior who posted “offensive” party invitations on Facebook.com. Acting on Park’s appeal, Hopkins has decided to amend its initial litany of sanctions, which included suspension for a year, 300 hours of community service, an assignment to read and write papers on 12 books, and diversity counseling. Park has elected to keep the details of the settlement private, but has told FIRE that he is satisfied with the final decision. While FIRE is pleased to have helped persuade Hopkins to […]

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    • Johns Hopkins University Resolves ‘Halloween in the Hood’ Case; Students’ Rights Remain in Jeopardy

      January 8, 2007

      BALTIMORE, January 8, 2007—After weeks of public pressure, Johns Hopkins University has reduced its draconian punishment of student Justin Park, who posted an “offensive” Halloween party invitation on Facebook.com. The university has concluded Park’s appeal, and he is satisfied with the outcome. The Foundation for Individual Rights in Education (FIRE) is nonetheless troubled that any punishment remains. Moreover, FIRE believes that the university’s conduct throughout this case—and throughout 2006 in general—leaves serious doubts about whether students at Hopkins have even the most minimal rights to free speech and due process. “We are obviously pleased that Justin Park is satisfied with […]

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    • William Brody Non-Responds to High School Student

      December 18, 2006

      Last week, I posted an e-mail sent to William Brody, President of Johns Hopkins University, by a high school student expressing his unwillingness to attend Johns Hopkins because of the deplorable manner in which the university is treating Justin Park. Below is William Brody’s reply. I have received so many emails on this issue I am generally not able to respond, but in your case I thought I ought to. Firstly, thank you for your very thoughtful e-mail. I would underscore, however, that this is a matter of civil conduct and the university’s obligation to promote a civil society within […]

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    • The Consequences of “Civility”: A Torch Reader’s Take on Hopkins

      December 18, 2006

      Dr. Roy Poses—friend of FIRE, President of the Foundation for Integrity and Responsibility in Medicine, and Clinical Associate Professor at Brown University School of Medicine—has written an interesting commentary about the ramifications of the call for “civility” written last week by Dr. William R. Brody, President of Johns Hopkins University. President Brody penned his paean to civility in response to FIRE’s extensive criticism of Hopkins’ suspension of student Justin Park for posting Halloween party invitations online that some students found offensive. As Tara usefully explained last week, President Brody’s argument is deeply flawed, thoroughly inadequate, and displays a seeming contempt […]

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    • Mike Adams on Justin Park and Johns Hopkins

      December 15, 2006

      Mike Adams has written another scathing indictment of Johns Hopkins for its decision to kick a student off campus for a year (among other punishments) for writing a Halloween invitation. Adams writes: Johns Hopkins University President William Brody (410-516-8068; wrbrody@jhu.edu) recently wrote a column in response to the public outcry over his university’s handling of the now-infamous Hopkins Halloween controversy. His column evidences both a profound ignorance of constitutional principles and a profane indifference towards intellectual honesty. Adams also makes a crucial, yet often overlooked point: What William Brody and other college administrators fail to grasp is that speech codes […]

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    • High School Student to Brody: I Won’t Attend Johns Hopkins

      December 14, 2006

      FIRE was cc’d on the following e-mail sent to Johns Hopkins President William Brody. The sender is a student who was considering attending Johns Hopkins University until he received word that Johns Hopkins had suspended student Justin Park for posting party advertisements on Facebook.com that offended some students. The e-mail read as follows: I have to inform you that because of Justin Park’s suspension and Johns Hopkins’ obvious disregard for the students’ moral freedom of expression rights, I have sadly crossed Johns Hopkins off my list of 1st choice schools. As a student with a keen interest in law (I’m […]

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    • Brody, Mill, and the “Truth”

      December 13, 2006

      To add to Tara’s skillful dissection of Johns Hopkins President William R. Brody’s “A Civil Tongue,” it’s important to remember that neither the inclination to censor “crude and tasteless speech” nor the concern with this reason for censorship is new. As FIRE states in its Guide to Free Speech on Campus: [John Stuart] Mill addressed one of the major rationales for imposing constraints on free speech on campuses today, namely that speech should be “temperate” and “fair.” Mill observed that while people may claim they are not trying to ban others’ opinions but merely trying to banish “intemperate discussion…invective, sarcasm, […]

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    • Remember What’s Really at Stake at Johns Hopkins

      December 12, 2006

      In the midst of all of the discussion about free speech at Johns Hopkins, it is important to remember what is really at stake here: a young man’s future. Justin Park, an 18-year-old Korean-American junior majoring in economics, entered Johns Hopkins at the age of 15 after skipping several grades in school. He has no previous disciplinary record. Until recently, he was the social chair of the Sigma Chi fraternity, and in that capacity he posted invitations to Sigma Chi’s Halloween party on the popular college website Facebook.com. Like many college Halloween parties across the country, Sigma Chi’s party had […]

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    • Hopkins President Brody: Civility Trumps Free Speech

      December 12, 2006

      Johns Hopkins President William R. Brody addresses the university’s extreme treatment of Justin Park in an article called “A Civil Tongue” that appeared in the Johns Hopkins Gazette yesterday. Brody states that expression should garner protection under principles of free speech only if it is “of a substantive and serious nature.” After citing two instances in which the university was wrong to suppress substantive, serious expression—a communist speech in 1940 and a student newspaper story mocking Lyndon Johnson in the 1960s—Brody juxtaposes the current controversy involving Park’s expression. He writes: But I think we all know that it stretches our […]

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    • Johns Hopkins’ Unique Interpretation of ‘Free Speech’

      December 11, 2006

      Last week saw the latest round of exchanges between FIRE and Johns Hopkins University regarding Hopkins’ suspension of eighteen-year-old junior Justin Park. On Wednesday, December 6, Hopkins wrote FIRE a letter defending the university’s overreaction to Park’s two Facebook.com advertisements for Sigma Chi’s “Halloween in the Hood” party. FIRE in turn wrote back to Hopkins on Friday, December 8. Hopkins Vice President and General Counsel Stephen Dunham defended Hopkins’ policies and procedures in his letter, stating that “The University’s vision includes an academic community where the exchange of ideas thrives, where activities are open and non-discriminatory, and where individuals respect […]

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    • Jason Antebi on Hopkins and Facebook

      December 8, 2006

      Jason Antebi, a graduate of Occidental College who suffered one of the worst abuses of campus rights that FIRE has encountered, has an article in FrontPage Magazine today on Johns Hopkins’ inexcusable treatment of student Justin Park. Antebi points out, disturbingly, that “Park’s case is not an anomaly,” and goes on to write a good review of several situations where college students have been punished for online expression. For a disturbing reminder, if one is needed, that college censorship is now spreading its reach even to the World Wide Web, Antebi’s article is worth a read.

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    • Mike Adams on Johns Hopkins

      December 7, 2006

      Mike Adams has addressed the suspension of Johns Hopkins University junior Justin Park in an article on Townhall.com. Driving home the excessiveness of Park’s punishment—which includes a one-year suspension and 300 hours of community service, among other things—Adams commented, “Fortunately, the committee stopped just short of making Park sit in the back of the bus when he relies on public transportation.” Precisely FIRE’s point. Not only was Park punished for protected expression (in and of itself a violation of his rights as a Hopkins student), but the penalty the university imposed on Park was extremely severe. As Chris noted recently […]

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    • Hopkins Ignores Due Process

      December 1, 2006

      FIRE’s mission statement makes clear that we work to “defend and sustain individual rights”—but what exactly are those individual rights? A few leap to mind readily: freedom of speech, freedom of religion, freedom of assembly, freedom of conscience. Those are easy; First Amendment rights are the all-stars of constitutional law. But while the First Amendment “freedoms” get all the attention, the right to due process is too often overlooked. That’s a shame—because in many respects, the right to due process is the guarantor of all other constitutional rights. Due process rights find their textual origin in the Fifth Amendment, which […]

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    • Expression, Not Harassment, at Hopkins

      December 1, 2006

      Inside Higher Ed features an article today about Justin Park’s suspension at Johns Hopkins University. The article concludes with a statement by Hopkins Executive Director of Communications and Public Affairs Dennis O’Shea, who told IHE, “There is a difference between expression of opinion and harassment.” There is no doubt a distinction between the two—I just don’t think that Hopkins knows what that distinction is. The entirety of Park’s crime has been to create two Facebook.com invitations to a Halloween party. Justin filled the first invitation with language suiting the party’s theme, “Halloween in the Hood.” After he was told to […]

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    • Public Pressure on Hopkins Continues

      December 1, 2006

      The press coverage of Justin Park and Johns Hopkins continues. United Press International, the Baltimore Examiner, and Inside Higher Ed all ran accounts of the story. In an editorial published in the Baltimore Sun, Gregory Kane, a black writing professor at JHU, writes: I’ve said it a couple dozen times before. Others have said it. We’ll just keep saying it until the idea sinks in: There is no right, constitutional or otherwise, to not be offended. The News-Letter, JHU’s weekly student newspaper, ran two articles about the case. Both document the extent of student unrest with the fairness of the […]

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    • FIRE in ‘The Baltimore Sun’ on Censorship at Johns Hopkins University

      November 30, 2006

      FIRE’s criticism of Johns Hopkins University for its blatant disregard for free speech has gained the attention of the Baltimore media. The Baltimore Sun reported today on Hopkins’ one-year suspension of student Justin Park, and on the letter that FIRE sent the university to protest the severe, life-altering sanctions imposed upon Park simply for engaging in free speech. Park is the social chair of Hopkins’ Sigma Chi fraternity, which was sanctioned for hosting a “Halloween in the Hood” party that offended some students at Hopkins. Park posted an invitation to the party on Facebook.com, and after students complained that they […]

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    • JHU Statement on “Halloween in the Hood” Party

      November 6, 2006

      In response to an “offensive” Halloween party, John Hopkins University President William R. Brody recently released a statement denouncing the party and outlining several diversity initiatives that will take place as a result. Perhaps the most troubling part of this plan is the emphasis on Principles for Ensuring Equity, Civility and Respect for All which mandates that “[r]ude, disrespectful behavior is unwelcome and will not be tolerated.” This new speech code runs completely counter to a very core concept of a university—the marketplace of ideas. It is impossible to present a wide array of ideas without, at one point in […]

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    • Hopkins Busts ‘Halloween in the Hood’

      October 31, 2006

      As the Baltimore Sun reports today, on Saturday night the Sigma Chi fraternity at Johns Hopkins University (JHU) threw a “Halloween in the Hood” party. The party was shut down because the invitation the frat circulated “invoked racial stereotyping” and because “[a] decoration outside the party site was a plastic skeleton dressed in pirate garb hanging from a rope noose,” according to a statement issued yesterday by JHU. The statement explained, The university is now conducting a full investigation into this matter. Based on the information received thus far, the university has suspended all activities of the Sigma Chi fraternity, […]

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