free speech zones

By August 28, 2013

Mississippi State University provides forums for the expression of ideas and opinions, such as the following:

1. Traditional public forums include the university’s public streets, sidewalks, parks, and similar common areas such as the Drill Field. These areas are generally available for expressive activity, planned or spontaneous, for the individual or small group at any time without the need for reservation or prior approval.

free speech zones

By August 28, 2013

The University of Oklahoma Chief of Police, or his or her designee, shall have the final decisionmaking capability and will decide how many police officers will be present, if any, and how
many security personnel will be present, if any, after being properly advised as to the facts
surrounding the event and the likelihood of potential disruptions or security threats … The
RSO/student shall be responsible for the cost of additional security.

free speech zones

By August 28, 2013

The areas designated as “Free Expression Areas” for speeches and demonstrations are the Tate Student Center Plaza and the Memorial Hall Plaza, which are generally available for this purpose between 8:00 am and 9:00 pm, Monday through Friday. Use of these areas for speaking, demonstrating and other forms of expression will be scheduled through the Department of Campus Life to best accommodate all interested users.

free speech zones

By August 28, 2013

The following areas may be used for outside speech events at UNCP by university affiliated or unaffiliated groups or individuals: (Maps are available for outdoor speech events. Contact the office of student affairs for more information.)

4.1.1.a. Tommy Statue near University Center Lawn; and

4.1.1.b. Plaza near water feature at Faculty Row.

Free Speech Zones

By August 28, 2013

Location
The basketball court, located adjacent to the residence hall, is the only location on University property designated for campus debates, forums, rallies, demonstrations, peaceful protests and other similar public forum activities. Any individual or organization may use the basketball court to address the campus community on a first-come, first-served basis. However, all such activities must first be registered with the Office of Student Life and Development who will handle all reservations. Other campus locations for non-academic events and activities are also scheduled through this same procedure.

Free Speech “Zones

November 30, 2011

Whenever I think Valdosta State University, Texas Tech, and Citrus College once had small designated campus "free speech zones," which implied that the rest of the campus was off-limits to protest and other forms of speech. All those school got rid of their free speech limits after they were mocked in the media. I then naively assumed that the college bureaucrats had been permanently embarrassed. I was wrong.

One reader just sent me this email:

…had to send you this photo I took 2 years ago on the campus of Chico State University. I thought it was ironic to have a "Free Speech Area" with this notice about restrictions.

No meetings? No handbills? What can students do at free speech zones? Apparently, not very much.

University bureaucrats continue to amaze. The Foundation for Individual Rights in Education, helps students fight such dumb rules. I sent the picture to Will Creeley, FIRE’s Director of Legal and Public Advocacy. He pointed out that:

FIRE named CSU-Chico’s sexual harassment policy-which bans faculty from making "stereotypic generalizations"-our Speech Code of the Month for March 2011. We also rate Chico a red-light university for maintaining policies that clearly and substantially restrict student speech.