Johns Hopkins University

By August 24, 2009

 


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Andre Massena was almost expelled from SUNY Binghamton after he publicly criticized a faculty member he thought was responsible for social injustice. With FIRE’s help, Andre graduated.

Johns Hopkins University earned its Red Alert designation by suspending eighteen-year-old junior Justin Park for posting an "offensive" Halloween party invitation on Facebook. Because some found the invitation racially offensive, Park was charged with and found guilty of "harassment," "intimidation," and "failing to respect the rights of others." Although it was later reduced in the face of public pressure, Park’s original punishment included suspension from the university for a year, completion of 300 hours of community service, an assignment to read 12 books and to write a reflection paper on each, and mandatory attendance at a workshop on diversity and race relations. Johns Hopkins President William Brody made matters worse shortly after Park’s suspension by introducing a new and chillingly broad "civility" code prohibiting "rude, disrespectful behavior" at the university, and by stating in an article in The JHU Gazette that speech that is "tasteless" or that breaches standards of "civility" will not be allowed. Read Full Article 

Speech Code Rating

Johns Hopkins University has been given a speech code rating of Red. You may read more about this institution’s speech codes at this page.    

A red light university has at least one policy that both clearly and substantially restricts freedom of speech. Read more here.    

FIRE Cases at Johns Hopkins University

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The Foundation for Individual Rights in Education (FIRE) is a nonprofit, non-partisan organization that unites leaders, faculty, and students to defend and sustain civil liberties on college campuses in the United States. FIRE protects and promotes individual rights including the rights to freedom of speech, freedom of the press, freedom of association, academic freedom, legal equality, due process, religious liberty, and sanctity of conscience—essential qualities of individual liberty and dignity. Learn more »

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Johns Hopkins University

By June 18, 2007

Johns Hopkins University earned its Red Alert designation by suspending eighteen-year-old junior Justin Park for posting an “offensive” Halloween party invitation on the popular social networking site Facebook.com. Because some found the invitation racially offensive, Park was charged with and found guilty of “harassment,” “intimidation,” and “failing to respect the rights of others.” Although later reduced in the face of public pressure, Park’s original punishment included suspension from the university until January 2008; completion of 300 hours of community service; an assignment to read 12 books and to write a reflection paper on each; and mandatory attendance at a workshop on diversity and race relations. Johns Hopkins President William Brody made matters worse shortly after Park’s suspension by introducing a new and chillingly broad “civility” code prohibiting “rude, disrespectful behavior” at the university, and by stating in an article in the December 11, 2006 issue of The JHU Gazette that speech that is “tasteless” or that breaches standards of “civility” will not be allowed.