Nevada universities earn ‘red light’ status from FIRE

December 21, 2010

by Thomas Mitchell

Las Vegas Review-Journal

 

Nevada is always on the “bad” lists. Thus it is with this week’s annual report from FIRE (the Foundation for Individual Rights in Education).

The organization analyzed 390 colleges and universities and found 67 percent (down from 71 percent the previous year) maintain policies that seriously infringe upon students’ free speech rights. FIRE rates these institutions of higher learner under red light, yellow light or green, depending on the level of restriction.

Both UNLV and UNR fall under the red light category. No specific explanation for this was provided.

A red light university is defined as: “A ‘red-light’ institution is one that has at least one policy that both clearly and substantially restricts freedom of speech … A ‘clear’ restriction is one that unambiguously infringes on protected expression. In other words, the threat to free speech at a red-light institution is obvious on the face of the policy and does not depend on how the policy is applied.”

Maybe that ill-advised speech code at UNLV lives on in some form.

“FIRE works around the clock to fight speech codes on campus, so we are obviously very pleased with the continued positive trend,” said Samantha Harris, FIRE’s Director of Speech Code Research. “But the fact remains that students at more than two-thirds of America’s top colleges and universities are being denied their fundamental rights. FIRE will continue to fight until that number is zero.”

View this article at Las Vegas Review-Journal.

Nevada universities earn ‘red light’ status from FIRE

December 21, 2010

Nevada is always on the "bad" lists. Thus it is with this week’s annual report from FIRE (the Foundation for Individual Rights in Education).

The organization analyzed 390 colleges and universities and found 67 percent (down from 71 percent the previous year) maintain policies that seriously infringe upon students’ free speech rights. FIRE rates these institutions of higher learner under red light, yellow light or green, depending on the level of restriction.

Both UNLV and UNR fall under the red light category. No specific explanation for this was provided.

A red light university is defined as: "A ‘red-light’ institution is one that has at least one policy that both clearly and substantially restricts freedom of speech … A ‘clear’ restriction is one that unambiguously infringes on protected expression. In other words, the threat to free speech at a red-light institution is obvious on the face of the policy and does not depend on how the policy is applied."

Maybe that ill-advised speech code at UNLV lives on in some form.

"FIRE works around the clock to fight speech codes on campus, so we are obviously very pleased with the continued positive trend," said Samantha Harris, FIRE’s Director of Speech Code Research. "But the fact remains that students at more than two-thirds of America’s top colleges and universities are being denied their fundamental rights. FIRE will continue to fight until that number is zero."