Oakland University’s Punishment of Student Makes National and International Press

By February 16, 2012

The national press has lit up over the news of Oakland University student Joseph Corlett’s suspension (and additional punishment) from the university over the contents of a writing journal for his writing class, where he wrote of finding his instructors attractive. Corlett’s appearance on MSNBC provided national TV exposure of the case and of Oakland’s very troubling punishment of his protected expression. You can watch the video of his appearance here

Elsewhere, numerous ABC, NBC, and CBS affiliate networks have covered the story of Corlett’s suspension (ABC News has provided national online coverage, and please also check out the latest from CBS’s Detroit affiliate). The Detroit Free Press has been there as well (its coverage has run also in numerous Gannett-owned newspapers regionally and around the country). See also the coverage in the Detroit News and Oakland Press, a pair of articles by Monica Drake in the Oakland County Daily Tribune, and coverage in The Oakland Post, Oakland University’s student newspaper. 

The case also has reached the Associated Press and United Press International (UPI). It has been written up in Inside Higher Ed, by KC Johnson for Minding the Campus, by FIRE Board of Advisors member Candace de Russy for National Review Online, and in The Huffington Post

On the other side of the pond, Corlett’s case has attracted the attention of Britain’s Daily Mail.  

Rock music sites are taking note of the case as well. The Van Halen News Desk is on it (remember, Corlett’s "Hot for Teacher" journal entry takes its name from a Van Halen song—and, yes, there is a Van Halen news desk). See also the Portuguese-language Whiplash.net (Brazil) and the Australian Tone Deaf music news site.

We’re glad to see such diverse and widespread coverage of Oakland University’s punishment of Corlett’s protected expression, and we hope the public attention continues so long as Oakland stands by its violations of his rights. 

For more information on Corlett’s case at Oakland, visit our case page (and check out Adam’s recent three-part blog series on why this case is all about protected speech), and consider writing to Oakland President Gary Russi today to express your concern for free speech at Oakland.

Schools: Oakland University Cases: Oakland University: Student Suspended over His Writing Journal