Texas Southern University

Location: Houston, Texas
Website: http://www.tsu.edu/
Type: Public
Federal Circuit: 5th Circuit

Speech Code Rating

Texas Southern University has been given the speech code rating Red. A red light university has at least one policy that both clearly and substantially restricts freedom of speech. Read more here.

This school does not have any cases at this time.

Red Light Policies

  • Student Code of Conduct: Student Code of Conduct Violations- Mental or Bodily Harm 13-14

    Speech Code Category: Harassment Policies

    (a) Intentionally inflicting mental or bodily harm upon any person; (b) taking any action for the purpose of inflicting mental
    or bodily harm upon any person; (c) taking any reckless, but not accidental action from which mental or bodily harm could result to any person; (d) engaging in conduct (including, but not limited to stalking) that causes a person to believe that the offender may cause mental or bodily harm; (e) any act which demeans, degrades, or disgraces any person.

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Yellow Light Policies
  • Computer Use Policy 13-14

    Speech Code Category: Internet Usage Policies

    When communicating with others via the University computer system, ensure that communications reflect high ethical standards, mutual respect and civility.

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  • Student Code of Conduct: Freedom of Expression Policy 13-14

    Speech Code Category: Policies on Tolerance, Respect, and Civility

    The University expects that persons engaging in expressive activities will demonstrate civility, concern for the safety of persons and property, respect for University activities, respect for those who may disagree with their message, and compliance with University policies and applicable local, state, and federal laws.

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  • Student Code of Conduct: Student Code of Conduct Violations- Disorderly Conduct 13-14

    Speech Code Category: Policies on Tolerance, Respect, and Civility

    Disorderly Conduct: Intentional conduct which tends to disturb the public order and decorum of the University, including, but not limited to, (a) abusive, profane, indecent, or vulgar language, (b) offensive gestures or acts, (c) unreasonable noise, (d) fights, quarrels,
    or other disruptive behavior.

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  • Student Code of Conduct: Sexual Harassment Policy 13-14

    Speech Code Category: Harassment Policies

    The University’s sexual harassment policy is designed to apply to employment and academic relationships among faculty, administrators, staff, and students and prohibits male-to-female, female-to-male, faculty-student and same-sex harassment.

    Texas Southern University has adopted and incorporated the regulations of the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) and case law that define sexual harassment and hostile work environment. Prohibited conduct and activities include: … Any verbal or physical conduct that has the purpose or effect of creating an intimidating, hostile or offensive working environment; Certain conduct in the workplace, whether physical or verbal, committed by supervisors or non-supervisory personnel, including but not limited to references to an individual’s body; use of sexually degrading words to describe an individual; offensive comments; off-color language or jokes; innuendoes; and sexually suggestive objects or behavior, books, magazines, photographs, cartoons or pictures ….

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Green Light Policies
  • Unlearning liberty

    November 30, 2012

    ‘At Stanford, I took every human rights class that was offered, every First Amendment class, and in addition to that, for six additional credits, I did an independent study on the origins of the prior restraint doctrine of Henry VIII and Queen Elizabeth I. That’s how much of a nerd I am about this stuff.’ Greg Lukianoff lets out a big hearty laugh, before adding, ‘And I really enjoyed that last one’.             There is no doubting Lukianoff’s passion for the principles of liberty. In 2006, he was made president of the Foundation for Individual Rights […]

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  • Colleges have free speech on the run

    November 30, 2012

     In 2007, Keith John Sampson, a middle-aged student working his way through Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis as a janitor, was declared guilty of racial harassment. Without granting Sampson a hearing, the university administration — acting as prosecutor, judge and jury — convicted him of “openly reading [a] book related to a historically and racially abhorrent subject.” “Openly.” “Related to.” Good grief. The book, “Notre Dame vs. the Klan,” celebrated the 1924 defeat of the Ku Klux Klan in a fight with Notre Dame students. But some of Sampson’s co-workers disliked the book’s cover, which featured a black-and-white photograph of a Klan […]

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  • In Texas, First Amendment Imperiled in 2008

    January 1, 2009

    I’m not sure what happened down in Texas in 2008, but administrators at several schools have been unusually cowardly about even the slightest challenges to their ideas of good order on campus. During the election season there was the Great Non-Riot of 2008 at the University of Texas at Austin (UT), where two students faced punishment equivalent to suspension or expulsion for posting political signs on their dormitory-room window, which inspired students across campus to vow to do the same in solidarity and in a noble exercise of the right to freedom of expression. Once student outrage reached a high […]

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