University of Arizona

Location: Tucson, Arizona
Website: http://www.arizona.edu
Type: Public
Federal Circuit: 9th Circuit

Speech Code Rating

University of Arizona has been given the speech code rating Yellow. Yellow light colleges and universities are those institutions with at least one ambiguous policy that too easily encourages administrative abuse and arbitrary application. Read more here.

Yellow Light Policies
  • Policy and Regulations Governing the Use of Campus 14-15

    Speech Code Category: Protest and Demonstration Policies

    Activities/events that are expected to attract more than 25 people, or that are advertised in any medium, must be preceeded by completion and approval of a Campus Use Activity Form not less than ten (10) business days prior to the expected time of such activities.

    » Read More


Green Light Policies
  • Student Code of Conduct 14-15

    Speech Code Category: Harassment Policies

    Prohibited Conduct …

    Endangering, threatening, or causing physical harm to any member of the university community or to oneself causing reasonable apprehension of such harm or engaging in conduct or communications that a reasonable person would interpret as a serious expression of intent to harm. …

    Engaging repeated or significant behavior toward another individual, whether in person, in writing, or through electronic means, after having been asked to stop, or doing so to such a degree that a reasonable person, subject to such contact, would regard the contact as unwanted.

     

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  • Acceptable Use of Computers and Networks 14-15

    Speech Code Category: Internet Usage Policies

    The University, in general, cannot and does not wish to be the arbiter of content maintained, distributed or displayed by users of the University’s computing and network resources. For example, the University, in general, cannot protect users from receiving e-mail they may find offensive. Using the University’s computer or network resources for illegal activities, however, is strictly prohibited. Unlawful use of University computer and network resources can expose the individual user and the University to damages claims, or potential criminal liability. Unlawful uses may include, but are not limited to: harassment and intimidation of individuals on the basis of race, sex, religion, ethnicity, sexual orientation or disability; obscenity; child pornography; threats; theft; attempting unauthorized access to data; attempting to breach security measures on any electronic communications software or system; attempting to intercept electronic communication transmissions without proper authority; and violation of intellectual property or defamation laws. Do not use computer systems to send, post, or display slanderous or defamatory messages, text, graphics, or images.

    » Read More

  • Policy on Threatening Behavior by Students 14-15

    Speech Code Category: Harassment Policies

    “Threatening behavior” means any statement, communication, conduct or gesture, including those in written form, directed toward any member of the University community that causes a reasonable apprehension of physical harm to a person or property. A student can be guilty of threatening behavior even if the person who is the object of the threat does not observe or receive it, so long as a reasonable person would interpret the maker’s statement, communication, conduct or gesture as a serious expression of intent to physically harm.

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  • Nondiscrimination and Anti-Harassment Policy 14-15

    Speech Code Category: Harassment Policies

    Harassment is a specific form of discrimination. It is unwelcome behavior, based on a protected classification, that a reasonable person would perceive to be sufficiently severe or pervasive to create an intimidating, hostile, or offensive environment for academic pursuits, employment, or participation in University-sponsored activities. Additionally, sexual harassment, whether between individuals of the same or different sex, includes unwelcome conduct of a sexual nature that is made, either explicitly or implicitly, a condition of an individual’s education, employment, or participation in a University program or activity, and/or when the submission to or rejection of such conduct is a factor in decisions affecting that individual’s education, employment, or participation in University-sponsored activities.

    Harassing conduct may take many forms, including verbal acts and name calling, as well as nonverbal behavior, such as graphic, electronic, and written statements, or conduct that is physically offensive, harmful, or threatening.

    » Read More


  • Weeded Out: How the U of A Fired Pot Researcher Sue Sisley After a State Senator Complained

    September 10, 2014

    By Ray Stern at Phoenix New Times Sue Sisley, M.D., is nearly blind.  She can’t see out of her left eye and has minimal vision in her right, resulting from amblyopia, a condition she’s had since birth. Her remaining eyesight “doesn’t seem to be deteriorating further,” she says. But in recent months, Sisley’s been trying to train Penny, a rescue dog from the Humane Society, for her potentially to use someday. It’s not really working out. Cute but undisciplined, Penny — wearing a blue vest — greets a visitor excitedly at the Arizona Telemedicine Program’s Phoenix office. On this Tuesday afternoon, 45-year-old Sisley […]

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  • Arizona Legislators Write to U. of Arizona in Defense of Academic Freedom

    August 25, 2014

    After the University of Arizona (UA) terminated its contract with researcher Suzanne Sisley, 17 Senators and Representatives from the Arizona State Legislature wrote to UA’s president and board of trustees in defense of Sisley, urging the university to reinstate a planned medicinal marijuana study under her direction.

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  • U. of Arizona Prof’s Marijuana Study Remains in Limbo

    August 12, 2014

    The future of University of Arizona (UA) Professor Suzanne Sisley’s research on the potential benefits of marijuana for treating post-traumatic stress disorder in military veterans remains uncertain after a letter from FIRE and continuing media coverage of the case.

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  • University of Arizona Professor Alleges Retaliation for Marijuana Study

    July 3, 2014

    University of Arizona (UA) Professor Suzanne A. Sisley has alleged that the university chose not to renew her contract in retaliation for her advocacy and research relating to medical uses for marijuana.

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  • Another Student Preacher Faces Punishment for Controversial Message

    April 3, 2014

    All too often on college campuses, police forget that their job is to protect students, not censor them. Over the weekend, Dean Saxton, a student preacher at the University of Arizona (UA), was arrested twice for disorderly conduct because of his preaching.

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  • U. of Arizona Students Follow Dean’s Suggestion: Fight Bad Speech with More Speech

    April 30, 2013

    The University of Arizona Campus in Tuscon - Flickr user UGArdener This Sunday in the University of Arizona student newspaper the Arizona Daily Wildcat, interim Dean of Students Kendal Washington White wrote to reiterate the importance of protecting expression that falls outside unprotected categories of speech like true threats and incitement—even if that speech is offensive. Many UA students were offended by the impetus for the column, student Dean Saxton displaying a sign on campus that read, “You deserve rape.” In her column, White reminded readers that “[a]pplying First Amendment principles on a university campus has never been easy,” but one must do […]

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  • Misunderstanding ‘Time, Place, and Manner’ Restrictions

    November 6, 2012

    This fall, FIRE is writing a blog series about how schools can reform their problematic speech codes and earn a “green light” rating from us—a distinction currently awarded to just 16 of the more than 400 schools in our Spotlight database, but one we hope to be able to award to many more in the years to come. In this series, we are discussing common problems with campus speech codes, focusing on examples from schools that are just a few small changes away from earning a green light rating. So far, we have examined how universities restrict speech by mandating […]

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  • Posting Policies Frequently Restrict Student Expression

    October 30, 2012

    This fall, FIRE is writing a blog series about how schools can reform their problematic speech codes and earn a “green light” rating from FIRE—a distinction currently awarded to just 16 of the more than 400 schools in our Spotlight database, but one we hope to be able to award to many more in the years to come. In this series, we are discussing common problems with campus speech codes, focusing on examples from schools that are just a few small changes away from earning a green light rating. So far, we have examined how universities restrict speech by mandating “civility,” […]

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  • Student Scrutinizes University of Arizona’s Speech Codes in Campus Op-Ed

    October 14, 2011

    University of Arizona (UA) student and Campus Freedom Network member Jonathan Messing penned an excellent op-ed in the UA campus newspaper the Daily Wildcat yesterday, drawing attention to the university’s speech codes. As Jonathan points out, UA currently maintains two yellow-light policies restricting student speech. While these policies undoubtedly chill campus dialogue and discussion, the good news is that UA is not terribly far from a green-light rating: It does not have any egregious red-light policies, and all it needs to do is revise these two yellow-light speech codes in order to become our latest green-light institution. Jonathan points out […]

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  • University of Arizona Eliminates Unconstitutional Civility Policy, Earns ‘Yellow Light’ Rating from FIRE

    September 2, 2011

    Congratulations to the University of Arizona (UA) for eliminating its one remaining “red light” speech code, a policy on “Civility,” from its Community Living Guide. As a result of this policy change, UA now has a “yellow light” rating from FIRE. UA’s former policy required students to be “respectful” in all of their relationships and banned “verbally,” “mentally,” or “psychologically” “abus[ing]” another person, despite the fact that speech cannot be constitutionally prohibited simply for lacking respect or being abusive.The former policy also banned “bigotry” in “verbal” and “written” form, but failed both to define the term and to recognize that much speech […]

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  • This Week in the News: Adam’s Vanderbilt Speech Still Provoking Discussion

    March 11, 2011

    Torch readers will remember that Adam delivered a speech at Vanderbilt University on February 23rd about Vanderbilt’s restrictive policies and free speech violations at other institutions. Trevor Williams of The Vanderbilt Torch (no relation) was the most recent author to write about Adam’s critique of Vanderbilt’s sexual harassment policy, community creed, and other speech-restrictive policies. Out west, the Idaho State Board of Education voted to suspend the Idaho State University (ISU) Faculty Senate on February 17, just one week after the Faculty Senate recorded a vote of no confidence in ISU President Arthur C. Vailas. A recent post in The […]

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  • Free Speech for Me, But Not for Thee: University of Arizona Student Government’s Thanksgiving Double Standard Exposed

    November 24, 2010

    The Freshman Class Council of the Associated Students of The University of Arizona (ASUA) sent out invitations to a “Pilgrim and Indian” Thanksgiving dinner recently, asking attendees to “break out those buckle hats and feathers” and come in costume. Why is this news? Because as Anna Swenson of the Student Free Press Association reports, this is precisely the kind of “stereotyping” that the ASUA has criticized and sought to punish in the past. As Swenson writes: Yet in other instances, ASUA has been quite concerned with continuing “ignorant and offensive stereotypes.” When the Daily Wildcat printed a comic many called […]

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  • Victory for Freedom of Association for University of Arizona Pro-Life Group

    April 21, 2010

    In today’s press release, FIRE announces that the University of Arizona has reversed course and granted its Students for Life (SFL) group official recognition, which gives the group equal access to university resources. After SFL’s application was initially denied by UA’s student government because the group’s proposed constitution required that members share the group’s beliefs about the sanctity of human life, SFL founder and UA student Jeremiah Lange came to FIRE for help. Interestingly, the situation presented by this case is a close relative to that confronted by the U.S. Supreme Court in the case of Christian Legal Society v. Martinez, which […]

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  • Victory: Pro-Life Student Group Finally Recognized at University of Arizona

    April 21, 2010

    TUCSON, Ariz., April 21, 2010—In a victory for freedom of association, the University of Arizona has reversed course and granted its Students for Life (SFL) group official recognition. The decision gives the group equal access to university resources. SFL’s application was initially denied by UA’s student government because the group’s proposed constitution required that members share beliefs about the sanctity of human life. After the student government denied recognition to his group, SFL founder Jeremiah Lange came to the Foundation for Individual Rights in Education (FIRE) for help. “FIRE is pleased that the University of Arizona has recognized its obligation to […]

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  • Victory for Freedom of Expression at University of Arizona; Showing of ‘Not Evil, Just Wrong’ Back on Schedule

    October 13, 2009

    The University of Arizona has reversed course and permitted the College Republicans to screen the film Not Evil, Just Wrong as originally scheduled, just days after telling the group that its reservation was being cancelled due to a scheduling mistake. The “mix-up” was discovered only 11 days before the event, making it difficult to reschedule. After a joint investigation by FIRE and a UA College Republicans (UACR) leader showed that the scheduling conflict might not have been a mistake, the screening was placed back on the schedule for October 18. According to UACR Director of Communications Katie Pavlich, on September […]

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  • Victory for Freedom of Speech at University of Arizona: Refund of Security Fee for Controversial Speaker

    July 6, 2009

    Today’s press release announces yet another FIRE victory on behalf of a student group unfairly burdened with the cost of bringing controversial speakers to campus. Late last week, FIRE learned that the University of Arizona was reversing its decision to charge the College Republicans $384.72 in extra security fees for an event featuring author and conservative activist David Horowitz. As FIRE has reminded America’s universities time and again throughout our ten-year existence, charging speakers or their student hosts for extra security fees solely because they may provoke hostile reactions from audience members affixes a price tag to protected speech and […]

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  • Victory for Freedom of Speech at University of Arizona: Refund of Security Fee for Controversial Speaker Marks First Victory Posted on New FIRE Website

    July 6, 2009

    TUCSON, Ariz., July 6, 2009—The University of Arizona has rescinded its unconstitutional security fee for an event featuring author and conservative activist David Horowitz. After the university billed the College Republicans student group $384.72 for security that it did not request, the club came to the Foundation for Individual Rights in Education (FIRE) for help. “The University of Arizona should be commended for respecting freedom of speech,” FIRE President Greg Lukianoff said. “Arizona joins a growing list of public universities that now understand that controversial speech may not be burdened simply because it might be contentious enough to bring out […]

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  • Arizona ‘Daily Wildcat’ Fights Back Against Would-Be Censors

    November 14, 2008

    As those who follow FIRE know, the student press is often a target of college and university administrators who would rather conduct the operations of the university without the glaring light of public exposure shining upon them. Quinnipiac University is probably the foremost recent example of this tendency. Unfortunately, though, censorship of the press on campus is increasingly not the sole province of the powers that be. The University of Arizona’s Daily Wildcat found that out when it mistakenly published a syndicated political cartoon that used most of the letters of a racial slur as part of social commentary about […]

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  • K. C. Johnson Strikes Again

    August 26, 2005

    The invaluable K. C. Johnson has an excellent op-ed in today’s Inside Higher Ed. K. C. does a wonderful job of collecting evidence that much of the ideological uniformity in higher education is not so much the result of “self-selection” but instead the product of an academic culture that uses ideology as a stand-in for intelligence or merit. His most interesting paragraphs relate how ideological uniformity is justified by a desire to create a particular academic orthodoxy on issues of race, gender, class, and sexual orientation According to Montclair State’s Grover Furr, “colleges and universities do not need a single […]

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