University of North Carolina – Greensboro

Location: Greensboro, North Carolina
Website: http://www.uncg.edu
Type: Public
Federal Circuit: 4th Circuit

Speech Code Rating

University of North Carolina – Greensboro has been given the speech code rating Red. A red light university has at least one policy that both clearly and substantially restricts freedom of speech. Read more here.

  • University of North Carolina at Greensboro: Review of Speech Codes

    January 17, 2006

    As a result of various issues with the First Amendment at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro, the school requested FIRE’s input on its “free speech zone” policy, which was under review. FIRE wrote that UNCG is legally “allowed to enforce ‘reasonable time, place and manner restrictions’ on activities that would significantly disrupt university functioning,” there is “nothing ‘reasonable’ about transforming the vast majority of a university’s property into a ‘censorship area.’” FIRE also criticized UNCG’s “Policy on Discriminatory Conduct” which banned any “disrespect for persons.” UNCG agreed to respect its political student groups’ right to freedom of association.

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  • University of North Carolina System: State of the First Amendment

    January 10, 2006

    FIRE teamed up with the John William Pope Center for Higher Education Policy to release the Report on the State of the First Amendment in the University of North Carolina System. The Report notes that UNC System’s many speech codes and illiberal restrictions on religious groups would likely not survive a legal challenge. It also reveals that “13 out of the 16 schools in the UNC System have at least one policy that both clearly and substantially restricts freedom of speech.”

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  • University of North Carolina at Greensboro: Punishment of Free Speech Protestors

    December 5, 2005

    When College Libertarians members Allison Jaynes and Robert Sinnott protested against the University of North Carolina at Greenboro’s free speech zone policy they were charged with a “violation of Respect” for refusing an order to stop their protest for being outside the designated free speech zones. FIRE wrote to UNCG Chancellor Patricia Sullivan explaining UNCG’s restrictions on free speech were contrary to the First Amendment. After FIRE became involved, Jaynes and Sinnott received notice from the university that the charges had been dropped. FIRE also learned that the chancellor established a committee to reexamine the university’s “free speech zone” policy.

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Red Light Policies

Yellow Light Policies
Green Light Policies
  • Acceptable Use of Computing and Electronic Resources 13-14

    Speech Code Category: Internet Usage Policies

    Individuals subject to this policy are responsible for exercising good judgment regarding the use of technology and information systems. Use of these systems is permitted, with the following restrictions and conditions: … The use is lawful and not prohibited by University of North Carolina Board of Governors or University policies, including rules regarding academic integrity, harassment, discrimination, copyright, trademark, and rules prohibiting use of State property for private gain or to advocate for or against a candidate or issue in an election. … No user shall send unsolicited mass communications without proper authorization from the manager with jurisdiction over the population to be reached. This includes the sending of “spam” (junk e-mail) or other commercial advertising material to individuals.

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  • Student Code of Conduct 13-14

    Speech Code Category: Harassment Policies

    1. No student shall threaten, coerce, harass or intimidate another person or identifiable group of persons, in a manner that is unlawful or in violation of a valid University policy, while on University premises or at University sponsored activities based upon the person’s race, age, color, religion, national origin, gender, sexual orientation, gender-identity, creed, disability, political affiliation, or veteran status. No student shall engage in unlawful harassment leading to a hostile environment. Unlawful harassment includes conduct that creates a hostile environment by meeting the following criteria: It is:

    • Directed toward a particular person or persons;
    • Based upon the person’s race, age, color, religion, national origin, gender, sexual orientation, gender-identify, creed, disability, political affiliation, or veteran status;
    • Unwelcome;
    • Severe or pervasive;
    • Objectively offensive; and
    • So unreasonably interferes with the target person’s employment, academic pursuits, or participation in University-sponsored activities as to effectively deny equal access to the University’s resources and opportunities.

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  • Outdoor Assemblies and Distribution/Petitioning Policy 13-14

    Speech Code Category: Advertised Commitments to Free Expression

    The University of North Carolina at Greensboro values freedom of speech as one of the fundamental rights guaranteed by the U. S. Constitution and as the best means for arriving at truth and mutual understanding. Peaceable assembly and the right to petition the government for a redress of grievances are also rights guaranteed by the First Amendment and are concomitant to the right of free speech.

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  • Sexual Harassment Policy 13-14

    Speech Code Category: Harassment Policies

    Facts will be judged on the basis of what is reasonable to persons of ordinary sensitivity and not on the particular susceptibility of an individual, unless that susceptibility is known to the alleged harasser.

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  • Protecting the First Amendment rights of NC college students

    February 16, 2014

    by Jenna Ashley Robinson and Tami Fitzgerald Public universities in North Carolina recognize a wide diversity of student groups, including those that have religious or other belief-based missions. This recognition enables student organizations to access university facilities and (sometimes) apply for funding. At some campuses, however, the lack of clear policies protecting the First Amendment rights of students in those groups has led to unnecessary legal woes for students and prevented groups from carrying out their legitimate missions. The UNC Board of Governors is expected to discuss the issue at its meeting Friday. Universities have muzzled their speech, mandated whom […]

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  • NCSA, UNC accused of restricting free speech

    July 2, 2007

    A report published recently by the Foundation for Individual Rights in Education (FIRE) criticized the UNC system, including the North Carolina School of the Arts, of violating the right to free speech guaranteed in the first amendment. In the report dated January 10, 2006, FIRE called the UNC system “…one of the most likely places to find rules and regulations that restrict expression or dictate matters of conscience….” The report, entitled The State of the First Amendment in the University of North Carolina System, identifies policies stated in the UNC Board of Governors handbook, as well as in 13 of […]

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  • Free-speech zones on campus at issue

    December 17, 2006

    Two students at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro face disciplinary hearings for staging a protest about the campus “free-speech zones” outside the free-speech zones. The students, Allison Jaynes and Robert Sinnott, helped organize the rally of about 40 people Nov. 16 on a lawn in front of the campus library, according to the Foundation for Individual Rights in Education in Philadelphia, which has intervened on the students’ behalf. When a school official told Jaynes to move to a free-speech zone, she refused and was later charged, along with Sinnott, with a campus violation. Jaynes, a senior physics major, […]

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  • The AHA’s Double Standard on Academic Freedom

    March 1, 2006

    by David Beito, Ralph Luker, and Robert “K. C.” Johnson Perspectives (American Historical Association) Has the AHA turned its back on academic freedom? In January, members present at its business meeting rejected a resolution to condemn attacks on academic freedom, whether from the right or from the left. Instead, they passed a weaker resolution that selectively condemned only threats coming from the right.We weighed into this controversy as part of a three person “left/right” coalition for academic freedom. Our chances were slim and we knew it. Only in December did we learn that the AHA business meeting would consider a […]

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  • Republicans and Libertarians, unite!

    January 24, 2006

    Dear George: First of all, I want to thank you and the Pope Center for Higher Education Policy for sponsoring my recent speech at Wake Forest University. I also want to apologize for wasting the students’ time by giving them some advice they really didn’t need. Please allow me to explain. One of the points I emphasized in my speech was the need for College Republican groups to form coalitions with other political groups – groups that do not necessarily share their political views – to combat First Amendment abuses at colleges and universities in North Carolina. I didn’t know […]

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  • Are colleges trying to be too nice?

    January 24, 2006

    RALEIGH – Can niceness be codified? Can you actually make a policy requiring politeness and only politeness? Apparently a number of colleges and universities across the nation, including some in North Carolina, think you can. The Foundation for Individual Rights in Education, an organization monitoring First Amendment practices on college campuses throughout the nation, believes that a number of the state’s public universities go overboard in trying to mandate niceness. In fact, a report that FIRE recently issued says that policies at many schools in the University of North Carolina system are overbroad and likely unconstitutional. “Disproportionately, we are finding […]

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  • First Amendment covers campuses, too

    January 22, 2006

    News & Record (Greensboro, N.C.) The First Amendment creates a free speech and assembly zone from one end of the United States to the other. Except at UNCG. University rules permit outdoor assemblies without prior approval only in two areas on campus. Even then, administrators must be given 48 hours’ notice. Fortunately, that policy is under review — just in time to prevent a legal challenge. Two students, members of College Libertarians, led a peaceful protest in front of Jackson Library in November and were charged with code-of-conduct violations. The proposed disciplinary actions against seniors Allison Jaynes and Robert Sinnott […]

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  • UNC-G loses ground in free speech battle

    January 19, 2006

    Two UNC-Greensboro students recently charged with violating the university’s free speech policy are no longer in jeopardy of facing legal action. Administrators reprimanded Allison Jaynes and Robert Sinnott on Nov. 16 during their protest of the university’s free speech zones. Officials asked the students to move their demonstration to one of the two free speech zones on campus. The students refused, citing the First Amendment. UNC-G’s free speech zones were challenged again in December with the release of a report by the Foundation for Individual Rights in Education. Robert Shibley, FIRE’s program manager, said the group has successfully challenged restrictions […]

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  • A right not to be nice

    January 19, 2006

    by Barry Smith Times-News (Burlington, N.C.)   Attached Files A right not to be nice, PDF, 109.5 KB , Times-News (Burlington, N.C.)

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  • UNC System Suppressing Free Speech on Campuses, Says FIRE

    January 17, 2006

    By Jody Brown at Agape Press A new report finds that 13 out of 16 institutions in the University of North Carolina system have at least one policy that “clearly and substantially” restricts free speech. The report — released by the Foundation for Individual Rights in Education (FIRE) and the Pope Center for Higher Education — accuses UNC of being especially hostile to Christian students and their religious liberty. The report is entitled “Report on the State of the First Amendment in the University of North Carolina System” — and FIRE’s Greg Lukianoff says what is revealed in the report […]

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  • Colleges to avoid, Part III

    January 17, 2006

    By Mike Adams at Townhall.com It probably comes as no surprise that the third university in my “colleges to avoid” series is located in North Carolina. Recently, the Foundation for Individual Rights in Education (FIRE) and the Pope Center for Higher Education Policy published a report criticizing the UNC system for its blatant in intolerance of free expression. Of the sixteen campuses in the system, only one university – Elizabeth City State University (ECSU) – was not criticized in the report. While students in North Carolina may want to consider attending ECSU, they would do well to avoid The University […]

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  • That’s unconstitutional!

    January 15, 2006

    The News & Observer (Raleigh, N.C.) Two groups that often criticize the University of North Carolina system said in a report last week that most UNC campuses have policies that restrict free speech and violate the Constitution. Here are excerpts from what the Pope Center for Higher Education Policy and the Foundation for Individual Rights in Education said about Triangle campuses. N.C. CENTRAL UNIVERSITY NCCU’s Guide to On-Campus Living provides that “[s]tatements of intolerance and/or harassment due to race, ethnicity, sex, religion, disability, or sexual preference may be subject to disciplinary action.” This policy is unconstitutionally overbroad because it prohibits […]

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  • Speech limits hurt purpose of college

    January 14, 2006

    By Ray Watters at Myrtle Beach Online GREENVILLE, N.C.—One of my funnier stories about college was how I got yelled at by three women the first week of my freshman year. It works better when you see me acting it out, so I’ll just cut to the punch line. My great offense was holding a door open for each of them. In the South. Horrors. It was a textbook example of what everyone had warned me about going to the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill. Of course, all their warnings weren’t true. The seven people sharing my first dormitory suite […]

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  • NC university system under fire

    January 12, 2006

    [To view the television broadcast of this story, please visit WWAYtv3.com.] WILMINGTON — North Carolina’s University system is coming under fire tonight for violating the constitution. A new study says the state system has serious first amendment violations at each state school. The report’s called [sic] Foundation for Individual Rights in Education, or FIRE, and that’s just what the author is looking to create. The report was done by conservative group, the Pope Center for Higher Education. The group comes down hardest on the larger state schools but found plenty of fault right here in Wilmington. They say UNCW’s biggest […]

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  • Report: School limits on free speech illegal

    January 11, 2006

    News & Record (Greensboro, N.C.) RALEIGH – Some public universities in North Carolina impose unconstitutional limits on freedom of speech, a report issued Tuesday said. The Pope Center for Higher Education Policy and the Foundation for Individual Rights in Education released the report. “It’s a public school system,” Greg Lukianoff, interim president of the foundation, said at a news conference in the Legislative Building. “It’s bound by the First Amendment.” One example cited in the report was a prohibition by Fayetteville State University on vulgar language. Another example was the prohibition on “disrespect for persons” at UNCG. Later this month, […]

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  • City & State Briefs

    January 11, 2006

    A report released Tuesday says some campuses in the University of North Carolina system impose unconstitutional limits on freedom of speech. The report cited examples such as Fayetteville State University’s ban on vulgar language and UNC Greensboro’s prohibition on “disrespect for persons.” The report suggested the UNC system pay more attention to First Amendment freedoms. It was issued by the Pope Center for Higher Education Policy and the Foundation for Individual Rights in Education.

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  • Report outlines limits on free speech

    January 11, 2006

    By Erin France at The Daily Tarheel Some UNC-system school policies of free speech and nondiscrimination violate the U.S. Constitution, according to a report released Tuesday. The report, created by the Pope Center for Higher Education Policy and the Foundation for Individual Rights in Education, detailed First Amendment violations, including violations in UNC-Chapel Hill’s network acceptable use policy, and cites two examples of religious discrimination against student organizations. In 2002, the University asked the InterVarsity Christian Fellowship to remove from its charter a provision requiring members to be Christians. And in 2003, the UNC-CH refused to recognize Christian fraternity Alpha […]

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  • Report blasts UNC’s ‘speech codes’

    January 11, 2006

    by Jane Stancill in The News & Observer (Raleigh, N.C.) Most University of North Carolina campuses have policies that restrict free speech and violate the Constitution, according to a report Tuesday by the Pope Center for Higher Education Policy and the Foundation for Individual Rights in Education.The analysis was commissioned by the Pope Center, a Raleigh organization that often champions conservative causes, and was conducted by FIRE, a national group that takes on free speech issues on both ends of the political spectrum.The report suggested UNC campuses are vulnerable to lawsuits unless they change their so-called “speech codes.””Hopefully they can bring themselves […]

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  • Report says state universities illegally limit free speech

    January 10, 2006

    Associated Press RALEIGH, N.C. — Some public universities in North Carolina system impose unconstitutional limits on freedom of speech, according to a report issued Tuesday. The report was issued by the Pope Center for Higher Education Policy and the Foundation for Individual Rights in Education. “It’s a public school system,” Greg Lukianoff, interim president of the foundation, said at a news conference in the Legislative Building. “It’s bound by the First Amendment.” One example cited in the report was a prohibition by Fayetteville State University on vulgar language. Another example was the prohibition on “disrespect for persons” at the University […]

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  • UNCG in free speech battle

    December 17, 2005

    Two UNC-Greensboro students face discipline for protesting outside the university’s designated “free speech and assembly areas,” based on a policy that a national civil liberties organization calls unconstitutional. The students, Allison Jaynes and Robert Sinnott, were charged with a “violation of respect” under the student code of conduct at UNC-Greensboro after a Nov. 16 protest attended by about 40 people. The two students face disciplinary action that could range from a warning to a probation with restrictions. The demonstration outside the library by UNCG College Libertarians was aimed specifically at the university’s policy governing the location of protests on campus. […]

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  • Protest outside free speech zone lands students in trouble

    December 16, 2005

    Two University of North Carolina at Greensboro students face disciplinary hearings for staging a protest about the campus “free speech zones” outside the free speech zones. The students, Allison Jaynes and Robert Sinnott, helped organize the rally of about 40 people Nov. 16 on a lawn in front of the campus library, according to the Philadelphia-based Foundation for Individual Rights in Education, which has intervened on the students’ behalf. When a school official told Jaynes to move to a free speech zone, she refused and was later charged, along with Sinnott, with a campus violation. Jaynes, a senior physics major, […]

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  • Students to protest UNCG’s free speech zones

    November 15, 2005

    The two places UNCG has designated free-speech zones do not meet the approval of some student political groups who also object to notifying administrators 48 hours in advance to use the small, overgrown areas. A coalition of activist organizations, from the College Libertarians to the campus International Socialist Organization, plans to protest the school’s policy Wednesday. The College Democrats and Republicans have also joined the cause, which was spearheaded by the Libertarians. Organizers said leaders of the Guilford County Democratic, Republican and Libertarian parties might speak at the event. School policy dictates that protests and student group gatherings occur in […]

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  • 10 great cigars and why I smoked them

    June 13, 2005

    By Mike Adams at Townhall.com For years, communism has been preventing me from enjoying a lot of good cigars. That used to bother me, until I found a way around the problem. As many of my readers know, there are more communists teaching on the average American campus than there are teaching in all of Cuba. And, of course, these communist professors do a lot of stupid things, most of which violate the United States Constitution. I have learned that fighting American communist professors is fun, largely because they are so easy to beat when challenged. That’s why I smoke […]

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  • ‘News & Observer’ Highlights Clash Between First Amendment and Nondiscrimination Policies

    February 17, 2014

    Some North Carolina universities have policies that explicitly allow student groups to limit active membership to those who share the core beliefs of the group, and, as FIRE has explained before, these policies are critically important for protecting students’ right to freely associate on campus. Unfortunately, not all North Carolina schools have such policies, and even universities that purport to protect freedom of association in this way have nevertheless attempted to suppress student groups under anti-discrimination policies. FIRE’s Robert Shibley helped author an article in Raleigh’s The News & Observer that detailed the problem—and a possible solution. The right to […]

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  • Fight for Religious Liberty Continues

    May 23, 2012

    In what can serve as an excellent lesson for campus officials who target the associational rights of their students, the University of North Carolina at Greensboro (UNCG) has reversed its ruling against a campus religious group and will now allow the club to operate at UNCG. Citizen Link reports that the school reversed its denial of recognition to the Make Up Your Own Mind club after the Alliance Defense Fund filed a lawsuit against the school for refusing to accept the club’s religious status and belief-based membership requirements. The decision comes in light of the ongoing debate at Vanderbilt University […]

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  • UNC Rejects the Heckler’s Veto

    April 24, 2009

    The First Amendment scored a victory this week at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill when UNC removed and arrested six hecklers who disrupted a campus speech by former Virginia congressman and illegal immigration opponent Virgil Goode. Goode was invited to speak on campus by a group called Youth for Western Civilization. Problems with disruptive hecklers had been expected in the wake of a speech last week by former Congressman Tom Tancredo, another outspoken opponent of illegal immigration, which abruptly ended when violence erupted. During Tancredo’s speech, a window was shattered and police used pepper spray to disperse unruly protestors […]

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  • At UNCG, Assembly Policy Sows Confusion—and an Arrest

    September 25, 2007

    At the University of North Carolina–Greensboro (UNCG), restricting student assembly is apparently something of an administrative tradition. Torch readers may remember the travails of UNCG students Allison Jaynes and Robert Sinnott, two members of the UNCG College Libertarians who organized a 40-person rally for free speech on UNCG’s campus in November 2005. After refusing to move their protest to UNCG’s “free speech zone” when requested to do so by an administrator, Jaynes and Sinnott were charged with “violations of Respect” by the school. At the time, UNCG policy designated two small areas of campus as “free speech and assembly areas,” […]

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  • Free Speech Zones, Past and Present

    July 10, 2007

    In yesterday’s Campus Alert, FIRE’s weekly column in the New York Post, we discussed the disturbing prevalence of free speech zones at America’s public universities. Providing readers with a representative sample of schools that either currently maintain free speech zones or have done so in the past, we wrote: Onerous speech zones have been reported at Clemson University in South Carolina, Western Illinois University, Florida State University, University of Nebraska at Omaha, University of North Carolina-Greensboro, University of Oregon, California State University at Chico, West Virginia University, University of Nevada at Reno, Citrus College in California and the University of […]

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  • Emmett Hogan on 2006: The More Things Change…?

    January 5, 2007

    Emmett Hogan is a student at University of Michigan Law School and a luminary early FIRE employee. As we looked back on 2006 in campus rights and abuses I wanted to check in with him for his thoughts on the past year in FIRE history. This was his thoughtful response: One of FIRE’s most gripping cases from 2006 involved a breathtaking exercise in thought reform by Michigan State University. FIRE publicly challenged what MSU calls a “Student Accountability in Community Seminar” (SAC) which is intended to address student behavior that administrators consider unacceptable; the seminar is successful only when it […]

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  • Zoning Out Free Speech at Joliet Junior College

    January 4, 2007

    Last week, the Daily Southtown (Ill.) published an editorial criticizing the trustees of Joliet Junior College for adopting a new free speech zone policy. Although the new policy seems to be improved because it moves these zones closer to where students actually gather, the editorial board rightly questions why the policy wasn’t completely abolished. The editorial correctly notes that “designating a ‘zone’ and setting up rules for how to use it doesn’t encourage free speech, it limits and discourages it.” Free speech zones are nothing more then a ruse used by college administrators to suppress the free exchange of ideas. […]

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  • UNCG Reforms Free Speech Policies

    March 21, 2006

    An article in the Greensboro News-Record reported today that the University of North Carolina at Greensboro (UNCG) has finally given up its policy regulating “free speech zones.” UNCG’s Facility-Use Policy quarantined organized student gatherings and protests to two small areas on UNCG’s campus. In November of last year, students Allison Jaynes and Robert Sinnott protested the “free speech zones” by leading a rally in an area that was not designated for student protests. When they refused a direction to vacate the area, both Jaynes and Sinnott were charged with a “violation of Respect.” After FIRE put pressure on UNCG to […]

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  • If It’s Called a ‘Free Speech Zone,’ Is It Still Censorship?

    February 8, 2006

    Although its campus is 200 acres, the University of North Carolina at Greensboro (UNCG) allows its students to assemble without prior approval in only two paltry “free speech areas.” FIRE believes, with good reason, that while administrators may enact reasonable time, place, and manner restrictions, all of a public university is a “free speech zone.” And even within these speech zones, UNCG demands that students give 48 hours notice if they plan to assemble there. As we all know, college students are nothing if not able to plan their lives at least two days in advance. More importantly, protests are […]

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  • Liberty in the Balance in North Carolina

    February 1, 2006

    The number of battles FIRE has had to fight in North Carolina is staggering. Even before our recent (and victorious) headline-grabbing case at UNC Greensboro, we have defended embattled professors at UNC Wilmington, Shaw University, Forsyth Technical Community College, and Duke University; two Christian groups at UNC Chapel Hill; a student newspaper under attack at Craven Community College; and red-light speech codes across the state. The place clearly needs help, and that is exactly what FIRE is trying to give it. Last month, we (along with the John William Pope Center for Higher Education Policy) released the landmark Report on […]

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  • College groups unite for free speech at UNCG

    February 1, 2006

    A controversy held over from the fall semester reemerged last week on the UNCG campus as student political groups protested and administrators scrutinized an embattled speech policy. College Republicans and Democrats joined the College Libertarians Jan. 26 for a protest in front of Jackson Library, which is not one of the designated areas for political activity. More than a dozen students braved the cold, windy weather to raise awareness and circulate a petition to have the policy changed. The UNCG Facility Use Policy designates the east lawn in front of the Elliot University Center and outside the Foust building as […]

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  • FIRE Letter to UNC Greensboro Counsel Lucien Capone, February 1, 2006

    February 1, 2006

    February 1, 2006 Lucien Capone III, University Counsel University of North Carolina at Greensboro Office of the University Counsel 303 Mossman Building P.O. Box 26170 Greensboro, North Carolina 27402-6170 Sent by U.S. Mail and Facsimile (336-256-0408) Dear Mr. Capone: In response to your letter of January 17, 2006, the Foundation for Individual Rights in Education (FIRE) welcomes the opportunity to work with you to “develop a free speech and assembly policy that preserves the rights we all hold dear while recognizing the legitimate needs of the University to adopt ‘reasonable regulations compatible with’ the University’s educational mission.” UNCG’s current Facility […]

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  • UNC Greensboro Shows Respect for First Amendment, But Problems Remain

    February 1, 2006

    GREENSBORO, N.C., February 1, 2006—In response to student protests, the University of North Carolina at Greensboro (UNCG) has agreed to respect its political student groups’ right to freedom of association. After the Foundation for Individual Rights in Education (FIRE) intervened, UNCG also dropped charges against students who demonstrated for freedom of speech. Now, FIRE is calling upon UNCG to abolish its highly restrictive “free speech zone.” “UNCG is finally starting to do the right thing,” said Greg Lukianoff, FIRE’s interim president. “We are happy to offer advice on how the university can live up to its First Amendment obligations—and our […]

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  • Couldn’t Have Said It Better Ourselves

    January 23, 2006

    A great editorial in yesterday’s Greensboro (N.C.) News & Record gives us some feeling for the hometown reaction to the case of free speech protestors Allison Jaynes and Robert Sinnott, who, until FIRE’s successful intervention, were due to be punished by UNC Greensboro for having the audacity to protest an unconstitutional “free speech zone” outside the “free speech zone.” Since the News & Record is, after all, a newspaper, one would expect it to object to this kind of infringement on First Amendment rights—and we’re happy to see that it does. Its conclusion: [UNCG] should do away with the very […]

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  • Honor code charges against UNCG students dropped

    January 18, 2006

    GREENSBORO — UNCG has dropped honor code charges against two students who protested in areas of campus other than those defined as free speech zones, according to the accused students and an education advocacy group. Student Code of Conduct violations were dropped against 23-year-old UNCG seniors Allison Jaynes and Robert Sinnott for refusing to move when told to do so by a university official. The case began after a November protest organized by the College Libertarians to object to the university’s specified free speech zones. During the three-hour protest, about 50 students gathered in front of Jackson Library — which […]

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  • UNC Greensboro Caves on ‘Speech Zone’ Punishment

    January 17, 2006

    Once again proving FIRE’s belief that universities cannot defend in public what they do in private, UNC Greensboro has dropped all charges against the students who protested the university’s “free speech zone.” As we note in today’s press release: This resounding victory for free speech came just days after FIRE and the Pope Center for Higher Education Policy released a report documenting dozens of policies from across the University of North Carolina System—including UNCG—that violate the U.S. Constitution. UNCG had been on the defensive since FIRE revealed in December that students Allison Jaynes and Robert Sinnott were to be punished […]

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  • UNC Greensboro Drops All Charges Against Free Speech Protestors

    January 17, 2006

    GREENSBORO, N.C., January 17, 2006—Bowing to public pressure, the University of North Carolina at Greensboro (UNCG) has dropped charges against two students who led a peaceful protest against the university’s policy of quarantining free speech to small areas of campus. The Foundation for Individual Rights in Education (FIRE) brought UNCG’s repression to light in December. “It’s about time that UNCG realized the error of its ways,” declared Greg Lukianoff, FIRE’s interim president. “Punishing students for having the courage to protest the university’s unconstitutional rules would have been an exercise in tyranny.” This resounding victory for free speech came just days […]

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  • E-mail from UNC Greensboro Asst. Dean of Students Brett Carter to Allison Jaynes, January 13, 2006

    January 13, 2006

    To:  Allison Jaynes [e-mail address redacted] Cc: Bcc: Subject:  Letter Katie Brown KRBROWN2/facultystaff/uncg 01/13/2006 04:03 PM January 13, 2006 Allison N. Jaynes [Mailing address redacted] Case #:  [Redacted] Dear Ms. Jaynes: The charges of the violations of Respect under the Student Code of Conduct, specifically, “failure to comply with the direction of a University official” and “violation of the University’s facilities use policy” have been dismissed.  No further conduct action will be taken by our office with regard to these charges. I wish you well in your future endeavors at UNCG. Sincerely, Brett A. Carter Assistant Dean of Students cc: Attorney General, […]

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  • Fiddling While UNC Burns

    January 12, 2006

    Tuesday’s release of the FIRE and Pope Center Report on the State of the First Amendment in the University of North Carolina System has already begun to get reaction from University of North Carolina administrators, who appear to be in deep denial about the fact that liberty is in a sad state on nearly all of their campuses. To wit, this quote from an Associated Press article that ran in the Durham Herald-Sun: Leslie Winner, vice president and general counsel for the university system, said the report will be examined carefully.   “Open debate and free dialogue are hallmark values […]

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  • Report Exposes Extensive Constitutional Violations in University of North Carolina System

    January 10, 2006

    RALEIGH, N.C., January 10, 2006—Today, the Foundation for Individual Rights in Education (FIRE) and the John William Pope Center for Higher Education Policy released their Report on the State of the First Amendment in the University of North Carolina System. The Report explains precisely what the First Amendment obligations of the UNC System schools are—and shows that most of them are emphatically not meeting those obligations. “The revelations in our Report ought to outrage everyone in North Carolina,” said FIRE Interim President Greg Lukianoff. “The UNC System is disregarding the First Amendment at public expense, each and every day.” FIRE […]

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  • The State of the First Amendment in the University of North Carolina System

    January 10, 2006

    A Joint Report of the Pope Center for Higher Education Policy and the Foundation for Individual Rights in Education Executive Summary If there is any fixed star in our constitutional constellation, it is that no official, high or petty, can prescribe what shall be orthodox in politics, nationalism, religion, or other matters of opinion or force citizens to confess by word or act their faith therein. If there are any circumstances which permit an exception, they do not now occur to us. —West Virginia State Bd. of Educ. v. Barnette, 319 U.S. 624 (1943) U.S. Supreme Court Justice Robert Jackson’s […]

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  • UNC-Orwellian

    December 19, 2005

    FIRE’s case at the University of North Carolina-Greensboro is making headlines—which really isn’t surprising given the outrageousness of the university’s conduct. (Did it not occur to any administrators there that cracking down on a free-speech protest might not be the smartest PR strategy in the world?) To get a taste of the heat UNCG is taking, check out this AP story, which ran in about 20 newspapers in the Carolinas over the weekend: Two University of North Carolina at Greensboro students face disciplinary hearings for staging a protest about the campus “free speech zones” outside the free speech zones. The […]

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  • UNC Restores Tradition of Holiday Travesties

    December 15, 2005

    The holiday season is upon us again. Christmas trees, menorahs, and lights festoon homes and streets. Shoppers drive around mall parking lots in a desperate search through a sea of cars for a parking space. Holiday specials take to the airwaves. Americans numbering in the millions travel to visit far-away family members. And some students in the University of North Carolina System get their fundamental rights stomped on. Yes, it’s beginning to look a lot like Christmas. FIRE’s press release today details the newest story of repression in North Carolina’s public university system. Two students at UNC Greensboro (UNCG) face […]

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  • UNC Greensboro Persecutes Students for Demanding Freedom of Speech

    December 15, 2005

    GREENSBORO, N.C., December 15, 2005—The University of North Carolina–Greensboro (UNCG) is attempting to discipline two students for peacefully protesting outside two small “free speech zones” on campus. Ironically, the students were actually protesting the existence of those zones, which unconstitutionally restrict free speech. The Foundation for Individual Rights in Education (FIRE) has intervened on the students’ behalf. “These students chose a very effective way to draw attention to UNCG’s unjust and unnecessary restrictions on freedom of speech,” remarked FIRE Director of Legal and Public Advocacy Greg Lukianoff. “It is shameful that they are now threatened with punishment for their peaceful […]

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  • FIRE Letter to UNC Greensboro Chancellor Patricia Sullivan, December 5, 2005

    December 5, 2005

    December 5, 2005 Chancellor Patricia A. Sullivan University of North Carolina at Greensboro 303 Mossman Building P.O. Box 26170 Greensboro, NC 27402-6170 Sent by U.S. Mail and Facsimile (336-256-0408)   Dear Chancellor Sullivan: As you can see from our Directors and Board of Advisors, the Foundation for Individual Rights in Education (FIRE) unites leaders in the fields of civil rights and civil liberties, scholars, journalists, and public intellectuals across the political and ideological spectrum on behalf of liberty, legal equality, freedom of religion, academic freedom, due process, and, in this case, freedom of speech and expression on America’s college campuses. […]

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