Unlearning Liberty: Campus Censorship and the End of American Debate

August 5, 2013

Liberty Law Blog

 

The next Liberty Law Talk is a conversation with Greg Lukianoff, attorney and president of the Foundation for Individual Rights (FIRE), about his new book, Unlearning Liberty: Campus Censorship and the End of American Debate. For those who have followed the pathetic censorship episodes on campus the past few decades, you might think that many of these battles had been won. Lukianoff, however, has the proof that free speech, freedom of religion, and freedom of association remain under siege on campus in myriad forms. Unpopular opinions, usually attributed to those held by conservative students and religious students, are frequently targeted by administrators laboring under diversity and no intolerance mandates. To put  it mildly, this type of heavy-handedness proceeds apace. Political comfort for certain students is privileged over the search for different forms of meaning and truth that other students might be articulating. Ultimately, Lukianoff wisely argues that the inability to argue, debate, and take ideas seriously on many campuses makes students dumber and indifferent, with consequences for public discourse and civil society that stretch beyond college years.

View this article at Liberty Law Blog.

Unlearning Liberty: Campus Censorship and the End of American Debate

January 15, 2013

The next Liberty Law Talk is a conversation with Greg Lukianoff, attorney and president of the Foundation for Individual Rights (FIRE), about his new book, Unlearning Liberty: Campus Censorship and the End of American Debate. For those who have followed the pathetic censorship episodes on campus the past few decades, you might think that many of these battles had been won. Lukianoff, however, has the proof that free speech, freedom of religion, and freedom of association remain under siege on campus in myriad forms. Unpopular opinions, usually attributed to those held by conservative students and religious students, are frequently targeted by administrators laboring under diversity and no intolerance mandates. To put  it mildly, this type of heavy-handedness proceeds apace. Political comfort for certain students is privileged over the search for different forms of meaning and truth that other students might be articulating. Ultimately, Lukianoff wisely argues that the inability to argue, debate, and take ideas seriously on many campuses makes students dumber and indifferent, with consequences for public discourse and civil society that stretch beyond college years.

Unlearning Liberty: Campus Censorship and the End of American Debate

November 13, 2012


Greg Lukianoff


About the Program

 

Greg Lukianoff, president of the Foundation for Individual Rights in Education, argues that America’s university and college campuses stifle free speech and discourage students from holding unpopular views.   The author contends that this environment has increased the country’s political fissures and decreased civil discourse.  Greg Lukianoff speaks at the Students for Liberty New York Regional Conference at Columbia University.

 


About the Authors


Greg Lukianoff

 

Greg Lukianoff is the president of the Foundation for Individual Rights in Education.  His writing has appeared in numerous publications, including the Boston Globe and theHuffington Post.


Buy the author’s book from: Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Indiebound

Unlearning Liberty: Campus Censorship and The End Of American Debate

October 24, 2012

10/24/12 — Topical Currents is with attorney Greg Lukianoff, who specializes in college campus free speech issues.  He’s written the book, UNLEARNING LIBERTY:  Campus Censorship & the End of American Debate.  He says “the road to censorship is always paved with good intentions.”  And for most people, free speech is extolled . . . until it crosses a personal border. 

Unlearning Liberty: Campus Censorship and the End of American Debate

September 24, 2012

While more than once using the phrase “PC run amok,” and spending a great deal of time on left-liberal bias among academics, first-time author Lukianoff is at pains to separate his book from the garden-variety conservative salvo against higher education. As president of the nonprofit Foundation for Individual Rights in Education, he casts a purposefully wide net over American academe. From a Georgia arts professor censored for parodying the Confederate Stars and Bars, to a Pennsylvania student barred from advocating for gun rights, the cases taken on by FIRE variously appeal to left, right, or hardly anyone at all, as with Colorado professor Ward Churchill, known for supposedly declaring 9/11’s victims “little Eichmanns.” Churchill’s appearance sets the seal on Lukianoff’s First Amendment absolutism, but this legalistic principle, however crucial to his argument, is less central to it than the cause of maintaining free inquiry as higher education’s pre-eminent value. This position drives unabashed criticism—which may split political opinion far more violently than his principled stand on controversial speech—of freshman orientation programs focused on specific issues like social justice and privilege. Lukianoff’s stirring take on higher education as an unrestricted intellectual journey remains free of the bile common to culture war screeds, though some readers may wish he had made his point less repetitiously. (Oct.)

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