Free Speech

At Duke University, the administration shut down a website after Professor Gary Hull posted an article entitled “Terrorism and Its Appeasement” that called for a strong military response to the terrorist attacks. FIRE took Professor’s Hull’s case to the print and broadcast media. Shamed by widespread publicity, Duke reinstated Hull’s web page, but required him... Read more Read more


Free Speech

Zewdalem Kebede, an international student at San Diego State University, verbally engaged several students when he observed them expressing a pro-terrorist position in Arabic. Although Kebede was never formally charged, he was warned that future "abusive" incidents would result in, "serious disciplinary action." FIRE responded with a letter to UCSD President Stephen Weber. Read more


Free Speech

University of New Mexico Professor Richard Berthold addressed the terrorist attacks of September 11th 2001 in his Western Civilization class, remarking, "Anyone who can bomb the Pentagon has my vote." Berthold apologized for the statement, and his speech was protected under the First Amendment, but University of New Mexico President William C. Gordon still nonetheless... Read more Read more


Free Speech

At Central Michigan University, an administrator told several students to remove various patriotic posters (an American flag, an eagle, etc.) from their dormitory. On October 8, a Residential Advisor told them that their display was "offensive," and that they had until the end of the day to remove the items. As one student said, "American... Read more Read more


Free Speech

The chair of the Department of Sociology at the College of the Holy Cross forced a secretary to remove an American flag that hung in the office in memory of a friend who fought and died on the hijacked United Airlines Flight 93 over Pennsylvania. When the secretary refused, it was removed by the chair... Read more Read more


Free Speech

Soon after the September 11 terrorist attacks, Johns Hopkins University Professor Charles H. Fairbanks voiced his support, at a public forum, for an aggressive campaign against states that harbor terrorists. He said that he would “bet anyone here a Koran” that his analysis was correct. One member of the audience charged that he sought to... Read more Read more


Due Process

At Orange Coast College, days after the September 11th 2001 terrorist attacks Professor Kenneth W. Hearlson, a professor of contemporary politics, invited all students to join him in a discussion of the recent terrorist attacks. During the event Hearlson argued that silence on crimes against Jews in the Middle East was consent to terrorism. Several... Read more Read more


Free Speech

On October 2, 2001 in order to provide a forum for discussion on the terrorist attacks, professors at the City University of New York (CUNY) held a faculty “teach-in,” in which several professors criticized America and its foreign policy. On October 23, the trustees of CUNY voted to condemn the “teach-in” as seditious. CUNY Chancellor... Read more Read more


Free Speech

Albright College unjustly brought charges of “professional unfitness” (read, courage) and “moral turpitude” (read, principle) against Professor of Communication Achal Mehra because of his criticism of school President Henry Zeman. Mehra found himself the object of bizarre charges and yet more bizarre campus judicial proceedings, all aimed at silencing his voice and stripping him of... Read more Read more



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