Newsdesk

Rhode Island recently enacted a law that bolsters professorial academic freedom at state colleges and universities. Read more


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Harvard students could soon be banned from joining any private social organization or club. Read more


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Essex County College wrongly fires professor Lisa Durden over controversial appearance on FOX News' “Tucker Carlson Tonight." Read more


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FIRE Intern and UVA student Julia Kothmann and explains the benefits of attending a college or university with speech-friendly, "green light" policies. Read more


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Despite disagreements over due process in campus Title IX cases, FIRE and Know Your IX agree that the status quo fails both complainants and the accused. Read more


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FIRE asks Trinity College to drop investigation into professor's facebook posts, which are protected by the First Amendment. Read more


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FIRE summer intern and rising junior at The College of William & Mary, Jacob Hill, argues that students must cultivate a culture of conversation on campus. Read more


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A test question about hot wax has landed one Howard University professor in hot water with Title IX investigators. Read more


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Late last month, a group of Jewish students and community members filed a federal lawsuit against San Francisco State University. The lawsuit alleges that SFSU has, for years, turned a blind eye toward the censorship and harassment of Jewish students and their allies. As I wrote in Reason last week, the complaint is a mixed bag, containing some very serious allegations but also sweeping protected speech into the charges of harassment. For example, as part of their harassment claim, plaintiffs cite posters featuring a picture of a dead child captioned “Made in Israel—Palestinian Children Meat, Slaughtered According to Jewish Rites Under American License,” and cite students holding portraits of hijacker Leila Khaled alongside slogans like “my heroes have always killed colonizers” and “resistance is not terrorism.” Read more


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In its “Anti-Harassment Protection and Academic Freedom” policy, Linfield College states that “ll members of the college are entitled to use speech to convey disagreement, agreement, inquiry, or commentary in keeping with the principles underlying constitutionally protected free expression.” That’s an admirable commitment from a private university not required to uphold the First Amendment — and it makes Linfield’s recent departure from upholding the values of free speech on its campus all the more disappointing. Read more



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