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Freedom of speech includes ‘offensive’ speech

February 18, 2014

by Hans Bader at the Examiner

“The Wandering Dago food truck wants to park and sell food at various events on New York State property. The state says no, because the name is offensive. Does that violate the First Amendment?” The answer is probably yes, says UCLA law professor Eugene Volokh at this link. He recently discussed the free-speech issue in a pending court case called Wandering Dago Inc. v. N.Y. State Office of General Services. The mere fact that a business’s name is politically incorrect, or offends some patrons, is not reason enough to ban it, as an appeals court ruled in holding the name “Sambo’s” protected in Sambo’s Restaurants Inc. v. City of Ann Arbor (1981). Of course, if it is offensive, the business may lose customers as a result, especially if its name does not appeal to patrons’ sense of humor...

Schools: Arizona State University