Loyola University Chicago

Location: Chicago, Illinois
Website: http://www.luc.edu/
Type: Private
Federal Circuit: 7th Circuit

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  • Was 2015 a Bad Year for Campus Free Speech? Let’s Ask the Experts

    December 28, 2015

    By Robby Soave at Reason.com Are easily-offended students and their allies within the university bureaucracy ushering in a new era of censorship on American college campuses? Even President Obama is worried that excessive political correctness is stifling legitimate debate at universities. Still, it’s hard to say whether the situation on campuses is truly dire, or even getting worse. In the past year, I’ve written about dozens of egregious free speech violations—but a mere collection of anecdotes does not necessarily indicate a trend. Indeed, the Foundation for Individual Rights in Education recently turned up some good news: the percentage of universities […]

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  • Student Activism, Race & Free Speech

    November 18, 2015

    By Aaron Henkin, Maureen Harvie and Connor Graham at WYPR.org The University of Missouri, Yale University, University of South Carolina, Occidental College, University of Kansas, Claremont McKenna College. The list goes on. College students across the country are leading protests and demonstrations to call attention to the issue of racial tolerance, diversity, and in some cases, the resignation of professors and high-ranking administrators. In this hour of Midday we’ll view this topic through national and local lenses, and hear the points of view of academic reporters, students, a college administrator and a free speech advocate. Our guests: Scott Jaschik,editor and one […]

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  • Students For Justice In Palestine Gets A Taste Of Discriminatory Treatment

    October 14, 2014

    By Greg Piper at The College Fix Nobody likes political groups. They are so … political! Can’t we all just get along, by censorship, fines and de-recognition if those pesky words don’t work? The Students for Justice in Palestine chapter at Loyola University-Chicago got suspended last month after its members blocked a Hillel information table and harassed its members – trying to stop someone else’s speech. Now, its fellow chapter at Montclair State University found itself on the other side of harassment, this time by its own student government, and the sanctions included a financial hit. The Foundation for Individual Rights in Education describes the situation the Montclair State chapter […]

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  • Students, Admins Cite ‘Safe Spaces’ in Seeking Limits to Media Coverage

    November 23, 2015

    One of many noteworthy aspects of the recent protests over racial inequality on dozens of America’s college campuses has been the effort by some protesters to bar members of the press in the name of creating a “safe space” to air their grievances. Many students have voiced concerns that the media would mischaracterize the story or, conversely, that the mere presence of journalists in a public forum would make students uncomfortable voicing their opinions. On November 9, University of Missouri communications professor Melissa Click made headlines when she asked for “muscle” to remove a student journalist from a campus protest […]

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  • Loyola University Chicago Backs Down from Demands That Students Censor Free Speech Wall

    May 12, 2014

    In April, Loyola University Chicago informed a student group planning a “free speech wall” event that it would be required to censor any messages that were “grossly offensive” or “contrary to the University’s Catholic, Jesuit mission and heritage.” After FIRE wrote to remind Loyola of its obligation to honor its promises of broad expressive rights on campus, Loyola backed down from its demands that students censor each other, and the event transpired as planned. FIRE is pleased that Loyola ultimately respected its students’ free speech rights and hopes that it will continue to do so in the future.

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