University of Texas at El Paso

Location: El Paso, Texas
Website: http://www.utep.edu
Type: Public
Federal Circuit: 5th Circuit

Speech Code Rating

University of Texas at El Paso has been given the speech code rating Red. A red light university has at least one policy that both clearly and substantially restricts freedom of speech. Read more here.

This school does not have any cases at this time.
Yellow Light Policies
  • Acceptable Use Policy 14-15

    Speech Code Category: Internet Usage Policies
    Last updated: May 5, 2015

    The following activities are, in general, prohibited: … Sending unsolicited e-mail messages ….

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  • Handbook of Operating Procedures: Sexual Harassment and Sexual Misconduct- Definitions 14-15

    Speech Code Category: Harassment Policies
    Last updated: May 5, 2015

    3.4.1 Sexual Misconduct

    Sexual misconduct includes unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, or verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature directed towards another individual and is unprofessional and inappropriate for the workplace or classroom.

    3.4.2 Sexual Harassment

    Sexual harassment includes unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature when:

    1. submission to such conduct is made a term or condition of employment or student status, either explicitly or implicitly;
    2. submission to or rejection of such conduct is used as a basis for evaluation in making personnel or academic decisions affecting that individual; or
    3. such conduct has the purpose or effect of unreasonably interfering with an individual’s performance as an administrator, faculty member, staff, or student, or creating an intimidating, hostile, or offensive environment.

    3.4.3 Examples

    Examples of behavior that could be considered sexual misconduct or sexual harassment include, but are not limited to:

    1. physical contact of a sexual nature, including touching, patting, hugging, or brushing against a person’s body;
    2. explicit or implicit propositions of offers to engage in sexual activity;
    3. comments of a sexual nature, including sexually explicit statements, questions, jokes, or anecdotes;
    4. remarks of a sexual nature about a person’s clothing or body;
    5. remarks about sexual activity;
    6. speculation about sexual experience; exposure to sexually-oriented graffiti, pictures, posters, or materials; and/or
    7. physical interference with or restriction of an individual’s movements.

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Green Light Policies
  • Handbook of Operating Procedures: Speech, Expression and Assembly- General Rule on Public Assemblies 14-15

    Speech Code Category: Protest and Demonstration Policies
    Last updated: May 5, 2015

    “Publicly assemble” and “public assembly” include any gathering of persons, including discussions, rallies, and demonstrations. … University persons and organizations may publicly assemble on campus in any place where, at the time of the assembly, the persons assembling are permitted to be.

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  • Handbook of Operating Procedures: Speech, Expression, and Assembly- Governing Principles 14-15

    Speech Code Category: Advertised Commitments to Free Expression
    Last updated: May 5, 2015

    The freedoms of speech, expression, and assembly are fundamental rights of all persons and are central to the mission of the University. Students, faculty, and staff have the right to assemble, to speak, and to attempt to attract the attention of others, and corresponding rights to hear the speech of others when they choose to listen, and to ignore the speech of others when they choose not to listen.

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  • Handbook of Operating Procedures: Speech, Expression and Assembly- Prohibited Expression 14-15

    Speech Code Category: Harassment Policies
    Last updated: May 5, 2015

    No person shall make, distribute, or display on the campus any statement that constitutes verbal harassment of any other person. This section applies to all speech on the campus, including speech that is part of teaching, research, or other official functions of the University. “Verbal harassment” means hostile or offensive speech, oral, written, or symbolic, that:

    a. personally describes or is personally directed to one or more specific individuals; and

    b. is sufficiently severe, pervasive, or persistent to create an objectively hostile environment that interferes with or diminishes the victim’s ability to participate in or benefit from the services, activities, or privileges provided by the University; and

    c. is not necessary to the expression of any idea described in paragraph 2.2.4.1.1 below.

    2.2.4.1.1 To make an argument for or against the substance of any political, religious, philosophical, ideological, or academic idea is not verbal harassment, even if some listeners are offended by the argument or idea. The categories of sexually harassing speech set forth in Section V: Human Resources and Equal Opportunity of this Handbook are rarely, if ever, necessary to argue for or against the substance of any political, religious, philosophical, ideological, or academic idea.

    Verbal harassment may consist of threats, insults, epithets, ridicule, personal attacks, or the categories of harassing sexual speech set forth in Section V: Human Resources and Equal Opportunity of this Handbook and is often based on the victim’s appearance, personal characteristics, or group membership, including but not limited to race, color, religion, national origin, gender, age, disability, citizenship, veteran status, sexual orientation, ideology, political views, or political affiliation.

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  • Colleges Blasted Over ‘Free-Speech’ Zones

    May 29, 2003

    By Lisa Falkenberg at The Associated Press DALLAS (AP) — Time and again, Ruben Reyes asked the University of Texas at El Paso for permission to hold protests about environmental dangers, the administration and censorship — typical stuff for a campus demonstration. Each time, Reyes was turned down by officials who said the student union where the creative writing student wanted to talk was not one of the two “free-speech zones” on the campus of 17,000 students. Reyes responded by joining a growing number of students around the country who have taken university officials to court, complaining that free speech is […]

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  • A space for speech

    April 28, 2003

    By Sarah Muench, Web Devil (Arizona State University)

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This school does not have any commentary at this time.