10 Ways You Can Promote Free Speech On Your Campus

10 Ways You Can Promote Free Speech On Campus

Check out this list for inspiration on some of the many ways you can promote free speech on your campus. Do one thing, check off the whole list, or get creative and come up with your own activism event!

Know Your School's Speech Code

Know Your School’s Speech Code

The first step toward protecting and defending your rights on campus is to find out if your school has policies that restrict speech. Learn how FIRE rates university policies and what you can do to protect the speech rights of students on your campus.

Adopting the Chicago Statement

Adopting the Chicago Statement

The “Chicago Statement” is a free speech policy statement that many universities have adopted, affirming their commitment to free expression. Learn more about the statement and what you can do to have a free speech statement adopted at your school.

Model Free Expression Resolution

Ensure that your school is the next to adopt a free speech statement! You can access sample student and faculty government resolutions in support of the adoption of the Chicago Statement here.

Chicago Statement Endorsement Letter to University

Chicago Statement Endorsement Letter to University

Write a letter to administrators at your school endorsing the adoption of the Chicago Statement. Using this letter template, all you have to do is fill in the blanks with the name of your institution and send it out in email or letter form.

Chicago Statement Endorsement Letter to Alma Mater

Use this letter template to implore the administration at your alma mater to stand up for free speech and adopt the Chicago Statement. Most of the work is already done for you. Just fill in the information and send it out.

Campus Free Expression Act Letter to Representative

Campus Free Expression Act Letter to Representative

Write a letter to your representative endorsing the Campus Free Expression (CAFE) Act, legislation designed to prohibit public colleges and universities from limiting students’ speech and expressive activity to unconstitutional “free speech zones.”