Freedom of Assembly

WOOD v. MOSS, 134 S. Ct. 2056 (2014)

Argued:
March 26, 2014
Decided:
May 27, 2014
Decided by:
Roberts Court, 2013
Legal Principle at Issue:
Did the Secret Service unconstitutionally discriminate against protestors when asking one group to leave while allowing another to stay?
Action:
Reversed. Petitioning party received a favorable disposition.

CASE INFO
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CASE INFO

Facts/Syllabus:
Protesters gathered outside of President Bush's hotel in Oregon while he sought reelection. Protesters alleged that the Secret Service agents gave only those protesting Bush's policies the order to relocate, allowing those supporting the President to stay. The Court found that the Secret Service was eligible for qualified immunity, and furthermore, the Secret Service did not break the law while protecting the President.
Importance of Case:
The Secret Service did not impose a viewpoint discrimination while acting to protect the president.

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Commentary:

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Topics: Freedom of Assembly, Protests

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