For K-12 Educators | The Foundation for Individual Rights and Expression

Teaching free speech principles to students couldn’t be easier.

Balanced curriculum and resources to help educators enrich and supplement their existing instruction on First Amendment and freedom of expression issues in K-12 classrooms.

FIRE’s curriculum draws on our 20 years of experience in actively defending free speech in academia, as well as our legal expertise and extensive network of scholars and educators. Students will learn why their free speech rights are so valuable, how they are essential to learning and to democracy, and about their proven history in securing justice and fairness for disempowered and marginalized populations. 

teacher standing in front of white board
Students sitting together on grass

Learn Your Rights!

Lessons

Knowing your civil liberties is the first step towards taking action for the causes you care about. When you Learn with FIRE, you’ll take courses on a wide range of topics, including free speech and due process, designed by our expert staff. These courses are for anyone who wants to know how to leverage their rights for change within their communities.

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Students in a classroom raising their hands
They love it because there is a lot of discussion, debating, and it deals with something they can relate to and think critically about controversies. — Mia, Chicago public school teacher

Engaging curriculum for your classroom

Students will learn why their free speech rights are so valuable, how they are essential to learning and to democracy, and about their proven history in securing justice and fairness for disempowered and marginalized populations.

Free Speech Curriculum

Cartoon illustration of a king riding on a chariot around a medieval village

Would you speak up if you saw something completely ridiculous?  Or would you keep your doubts to yourself?

The Emperor’s New Clothes and Independent Thought

Featured Lesson

This lesson examines the importance of thinking for oneself, even if everyone else disagrees, using Hans Christian Andersen's fable, The Emperor's New Clothes.

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