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So to Speak: The Free Speech Podcast

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So to Speak: The Free Speech Podcast
Ep. 172 What does the First Amendment protect on social media? 

Oct 05, 2022

Does the First Amendment to the United States Constitution protect a private social media company’s right to moderate content on its platform?

A new ruling from the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit says it does not, and that a Texas law preventing viewpoint discrimination on social media platforms is constitutional.

The issue is likely bound for the Supreme Court, setting up what is arguably the most consequential First Amendment legal case in a half-century.

Institute for Free Speech Chairman and Founder Brad Smith and George Mason University law professor Ilya Somin join us to debate the ruling and the future of free speech on the internet.

Does the First Amendment to the United States Constitution protect a private social media company’s right to moderate content on its platform?

A new ruling from the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit says it does not, and that a Texas law preventing viewpoint discrimination on social media platforms is constitutional.

The issue is likely bound for the Supreme Court, setting up what is arguably the most consequential First Amendment legal case in a half-century.

Institute for Free Speech Chairman and Founder Brad Smith and George Mason University law professor Ilya Somin join us to debate the ruling and the future of free speech on the internet.

Show notes:

www.sotospeakpodcast.com
YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/SotoSpeakTheFreeSpeechPodcast
Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/freespeechtalk
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/sotospeakpodcast
Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/freespeechtalk/
Email us: sotospeak@thefire.org

Read more


So to Speak: The Free Speech Podcast
Ep. 171 Nature Human Misbehavior 

Sep 29, 2022

“Should academic journals appoint themselves social justice gatekeepers?”

That is the question journalist and author Jonathan Rauch asks in responding to new ethics guidance from the academic journal Nature Human Behaviour. The journal introduces the guidance by ominously noting that “although academic freedom is fundamental, it is not unbounded.” It then goes on to discuss ways it will restrict publishing research that allegedly harms, stigmatizes, or otherwise “undermines the dignity or rights of specific groups” — even inadvertently.

Rauch joins the show, along with University of Southern California professor Anna Krylov.

“Should academic journals appoint themselves social justice gatekeepers?”

That is the question journalist and author Jonathan Rauch asks in responding to new ethics guidance from the academic journal Nature Human Behaviour. The journal introduces the guidance by ominously noting that “although academic freedom is fundamental, it is not unbounded.” It then goes on to discuss ways it will restrict publishing research that allegedly harms, stigmatizes, or otherwise “undermines the dignity or rights of specific groups” — even inadvertently.

Rauch joins the show, along with University of Southern California professor Anna Krylov.

Show notes:

www.sotospeakpodcast.com
YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/SotoSpeakTheFreeSpeechPodcast
Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/freespeechtalk
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/sotospeakpodcast
Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/freespeechtalk/
Email us: sotospeak@thefire.org

Read more


So to Speak: The Free Speech Podcast
Ep. 170 Free speech and the American Founding 

Sep 15, 2022

This Saturday, Sept. 17, is Constitution Day. It was on this day in 1787 that delegates to the Constitutional Convention signed America’s Constitution. And while the First Amendment was not ratified until 1791, discussions over the role of free speech and expression in a democratic society were alive long before then.

This Saturday, Sept. 17, is Constitution Day. It was on this day in 1787 that delegates to the Constitutional Convention signed America’s Constitution. And while the First Amendment was not ratified until 1791, discussions over the role of free speech and expression in a democratic society were alive long before then.

Pepperdine University professor and author Gordon Lloyd joins the show this week to explore how the American conception of free speech came to be, from the colonial era to the ratification of the Bill of Rights.

Drawing from over 40 years of research, Lloyd discusses examples of free speech and expression during the founding, ranging from 1641, when the Massachusetts Body of Liberties — the earliest known protection of free speech in the colonies — was published; to 1776, when free speech aided the decision to declare independence from Great Britain; to the late 1780s, when federalist and anti-federalist publications sparked, in Lloyd’s words, “the greatest pamphlet war the world has ever seen.”

Show notes:

www.sotospeakpodcast.com

YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/SotoSpeakTheFreeSpeechPodcast
Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/freespeechtalk
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/sotospeakpodcast
Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/freespeechtalk/
Email us: sotospeak@thefire.org

Read more


So to Speak: The Free Speech Podcast
Ep. 169 The Art of Insubordination 

Sep 01, 2022

What can Charles Darwin teach us about dissent? What do the professional basketball careers of Wilt Chamberlain and Rick Barry tell us about conventional wisdom?

On today’s show, George Mason University Professor Todd Kashdan helps us understand the value of principled dissent: what it is, how to do it, and the pitfalls to avoid. He is the author of “The Art of Insubordination: How to Dissent and Defy Effectively.” 

What can Charles Darwin teach us about dissent? What do the professional basketball careers of Wilt Chamberlain and Rick Barry tell us about conventional wisdom?

On today’s show, George Mason University Professor Todd Kashdan helps us understand the value of principled dissent: what it is, how to do it, and the pitfalls to avoid. He is the author of “The Art of Insubordination: How to Dissent and Defy Effectively.” 

Show notes:

www.sotospeakpodcast.com

YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/SotoSpeakTheFreeSpeechPodcast
Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/freespeechtalk
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/sotospeakpodcast
Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/freespeechtalk/
Email us: sotospeak@thefire.org

Read more


So to Speak: The Free Speech Podcast
Ep. 168 Assassin’s veto comes for Rushdie 

Aug 17, 2022

Last week, a would-be assassin attacked Salman Rushdie, author of “The Satanic Verses,”  in an apparent attempt to carry out the infamous fatwa placed on Rushdie’s life. Fortunately, Rushdie survived the attack. Vice News Tonight correspondent and “The Fifth Column” podcast co-host Michael Moynihan joins the show to discuss what happened, what it means for free speech, and the history of “The Satanic Verses” controversy. 

Last week, a would-be assassin attacked Salman Rushdie, author of “The Satanic Verses,”  in an apparent attempt to carry out the infamous fatwa placed on Rushdie’s life. Fortunately, Rushdie survived the attack. Vice News Tonight correspondent and “The Fifth Column” podcast co-host Michael Moynihan joins the show to discuss what happened, what it means for free speech, and the history of “The Satanic Verses” controversy. 

Show notes:

www.sotospeakpodcast.com
YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/SotoSpeakTheFreeSpeechPodcast
Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/freespeechtalk
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/sotospeakpodcast
Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/freespeechtalk/
Email us: sotospeak@thefire.org

Read more

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