FIRE’s Advisory Council

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Nicholas A. Christakis

Nicholas A. Christakis

Nicholas A. Christakis, MD, PhD, MPH, is a social scientist and physician at Yale University, and one of the world’s foremost authorities on social networks. He directs the Human Nature Lab and is the Co-Director of the Yale Institute for Network Science. At Yale, he is the Sterling Professor of Social and Natural Science, appointed in the Departments of Sociology; Data Science; Ecology and Evolutionary Biology; Biomedical Engineering; Medicine; and the School of Management. He was elected to the National Academy of Medicine in 2006; the American Association for the Advancement of Science in 2010; and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 2017. Dr. Christakis is the author of over 200 articles and several books, including Connected: The Surprising Power of Our Social Networks and How They Shape Our Lives; Blueprint: The Evolutionary Origins of a Good Society; and Apollo’s Arrow: The Profound and Enduring Impact of Coronavirus on the Way We Live. In 2009, Christakis was named by Time magazine to their annual list of the 100 most influential people in the world. In 2009 and in 2010, he was listed by Foreign Policy magazine in their annual list of Top 100 Global Thinkers.


Robert Corn-Revere

Robert Corn-Revere

Robert Corn-Revere is a partner in the Washington, D.C. office of Davis Wright Tremaine LLP, specializing in freedom of expression and communications law. He is regularly listed as a leading First Amendment and media law practitioner by The Best Lawyers in America, SuperLawyers Washington, D.C., and by Chambers USA. Best Lawyers in America named him as Washington, D.C.’s 2017 “Lawyer of the Year” in the areas of First Amendment Law and Litigation – First Amendment. He was again named as Best Lawyers’ “Lawyer of the Year” for First Amendment Law for 2019 and 2021, and in Media Law for 2022.

Mr. Corn-Revere formerly served as Chief Counsel to Chairman James H. Quello of the Federal Communications Commission. After leaving the FCC for private practice, he has served as lead counsel in a number of precedent-setting First Amendment cases. Mr. Corn-Revere successfully defended CBS Broadcasting in the “wardrobe malfunction” case arising from the 2004 Super Bowl halftime show. He argued United States v. Playboy Entertainment Group, Inc., in which the U.S. Supreme Court struck down part of the Telecommunications Act of 1996 that regulated adult cable television networks, and he served as co-counsel in United States v. Stevens, in which the Supreme Court held that a federal statute prohibiting depictions of animal cruelty violates the First Amendment.

In 2003, Mr. Corn-Revere successfully petitioned Governor George E. Pataki to grant the first posthumous pardon in New York history to the late comedian Lenny Bruce who was convicted for “obscene” comedy routines.

He has written widely on First Amendment and communications law issues, and is co-author of a three-volume treatise published by West Group entitled Modern Communications Law. His latest book, The Mind of the Censor and the Eye of the Beholder: The First Amendment and the Censor’s Dilemma, uses readable and engaging stories to show how freedom of expression is essential to American identity. It was released by Cambridge University Press in November 2021.


Karith Foster

Karith Foster

Best known for her stand up comedy, TEDx talk, and television and radio appearances, Karith Foster is a Diversity Engagement Specialist with the Foster Russell Family Foundation. “If you can laugh at it you can get through it” is both Karith’s motto and the lesson she seeks to instill in others. Her signature programs Stereotyped 101,™ You Are E.N.O.U.G.H,™ The Humor Initiative,™ and Can We Speak Freely?™ are impacting lives at academic institutions, organizations and corporations across America. Karith founded the Foster Russell Family Foundation to inspire free speech, social change and empowerment, and to make a difference through education and mentorship at a time when humor, understanding, and respect are in short supply.

Karith is an alumna of Stephens College (Missouri) and Oxford University.


Ira Glasser

Ira Glasser

Mr. Glasser served as Executive Director of the American Civil Liberties Union from 1978- 2001. Previously, he was Executive Director of the New York Civil Liberties Union. Prior to his affiliation with the ACLU, Mr. Glasser was a mathematician and a member of the science and mathematics faculties of Queens College and Sarah Lawrence College, and was also editor of Current magazine. Mr. Glasser authored the book, Visions of Liberty: The Bill of Rights for All Americans, an insightful analysis of how our rights developed, written to commemorate the 200th anniversary of the Bill of Rights. Mr. Glasser is a widely published essayist on civil liberties principles and issues. His work has appeared in The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Village Voice, Harper’s, The New Republic, The Nation, and Christianity and Crisis, among other publications. He is also the co-author of Doing Good: The Limits of Benevolence.

Mr. Glasser received a B.S. degree in mathematics and graduated with honors in literature and the arts from Queens College in 1959. He has a master’s degree in mathematics from Ohio State University and also studied sociology and philosophy at the graduate level at the New School for Social Research. Born and raised in New York, Mr. Glasser is married, the father of four children, and the grandfather of ten.


Erica Goldberg

Erica Goldberg

Professor Erica Goldberg, who teaches Torts, Constitutional Law, and Criminal Procedure at the University of Dayton School of Law, began her scholarly career as a legal fellow at the Foundation for Individual Rights and Expression. After graduating from Stanford Law School, Professor Goldberg clerked for Judge Ronald L. Gilman on the United States Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit. She then practiced appellate litigation at Latham & Watkins LLP, working on briefs before several courts of appeals and the Supreme Court; and served as a Robert H. Jackson Legal Fellow at the Foundation for Individual Rights and Expression.

Prior to her appointment at Dayton Law School, Professor Goldberg was an assistant professor at Ohio Northern University Law School. She also taught Legal Research and Writing as a Climenko Fellow and Lecturer on Law at Harvard Law School; and Civil Procedure, Criminal Procedure, and Law and Religion as a Visiting Assistant Professor at Penn State Law School.

Professor Goldberg’s scholarship focuses on the intersection of tort law remedies and First Amendment rights. She has published in the Columbia Law Review, Cardozo Law Review, Connecticut Law Review, Villanova Law Review, Arizona Law Review, and Michigan Law Review First Impressions. She blogs at In a Crowded Theater, and links to her blog posts have appeared in media outlets including The Washington Post and CNN. She has also contributed pieces on the First Amendment to The Conversation. Professor Goldberg tries to live life according to her free speech values, both in her daily interactions and in her classroom.


Sallie James

Sallie James

Sallie James is the director of development at the Cato Institute.

Before joining Cato as a trade policy analyst in 2006, James was an executive officer in the Office of Trade Negotiations in the Australian government’s Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade. Prior to that she was a Senior Policy Adviser in the Australian government’s Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry. She held numerous research and teaching positions while studying.

Her articles have been published in the San Francisco Chronicle, Orange County Register, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, Minneapolis Star Tribune and other American newspapers as well as the Australian Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics and the European Review of Agricultural Economics. James has appeared on BBC World, CNBC, MSNBC, CNN, Fox News Channel, Bloomberg TV, NPR, and other TV and radio outlets.

James received both her bachelor’s and master’s degrees in economics from the University of Adelaide, and her doctorate in agricultural economics from the University of Western Australia.


Wendy Kaminer

Wendy Kaminer

Wendy Kaminer, a lawyer and social critic, writes about law, liberty, feminism, religion, criminal justice and popular culture. A former Guggenheim fellow, Visiting Scholar and Public Policy Fellow at Radcliffe College, and recipient of the Smith College Medal, she is the author of eight books, including WORST INSTINCTS: Cowardice, Conformity and the ACLU; FREE FOR ALL: Defending Liberty in America Today; and I’M DYSFUNCTIONAL, YOU’RE DYSFUNCTIONAL: The Recovery Movement & Other Self-Help Fashions. Her articles and reviews have appeared in numerous publications including theatlantic.com, The New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, the Boston Globe, The American Prospect, Free Inquiry, and spiked-online.com. Her commentaries have aired on National Public Radio.

Before embarking on her writing career, Wendy briefly practiced law, for the New York Legal Aid Society and the New York City Mayor’s Office. She has served on the national board of the American Civil Liberties Union as well as the board of the Massachusetts ACLU, and is a former chair of the Bill of Rights Defense Committee. She is currently a member of the Massachusetts State Advisory Committee to the U.S. Civil Rights Commission and the advisory board of the Secular Coalition for America.


Timur Kuran

Timur Kuran

Timur Kuran is a professor of economics and political science and is the Gorter Family Professor of Islamic Studies at Duke University.

His most recent book is on the historical reasons why the Middle East is the world’s most repressive region: “Freedoms Delayed: The Political Legacy of Islamic Law in the Middle East” (forthcoming in early 2023). Among his other publications are “Islam and Mammon: The Economic Predicaments of Islamism” (Princeton University Press), “The Long Divergence: How Islamic Law Held Back the Middle East” (Princeton University Press), and “Private Truths, Public Lies: The Social Consequences of Preference Falsification” (Harvard University Press), all translated into multiple languages. The last book provides a theory of how preference falsification, the act of misrepresenting one’s wants under perceived social pressures, shapes collective decisions, orients structural change, sustains social stability, distorts human knowledge, and conceals political possibilities. He is at work on a sequel to this book, which focuses on the role that preference falsification plays in political polarization in the United States and elsewhere.

Kuran currently directs the Association for Analytic Learning about Islam and Muslim Societies (AALIMS); co-edits a book series for Cambridge University Press, “Economics, Choice and Society”; co-edits the Journal of Comparative Economics; and serves on numerous editorial boards.
Kuran earned a Bachelor of Arts degree from Princeton University and a Master of Arts degree and Ph.D. from Stanford University, all in economics.


David Lat

David Lat

David Lat is a lawyer turned writer. He publishes Original Jurisdiction, a newsletter on Substack about law and legal affairs, and he writes for newspapers and magazines including the New York Times, Washington Post, and Wall Street Journal. Prior to launching Original Jurisdiction, David founded Above the Law, one of the nation’s most widely read legal news websites, and Underneath Their Robes, a popular blog about federal judges that he wrote under a pseudonym. He is also the author of a novel set in the world of the federal courts, Supreme Ambitions.

Before entering the media world, David worked as a federal prosecutor in Newark, New Jersey; a litigation associate at Wachtell, Lipton, Rosen & Katz, in New York; and a law clerk to Judge Diarmuid F. O’Scannlain of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit. David graduated from Harvard College and Yale Law School, where he served as an editor of the Yale Law Journal.


Peter Malkin

Peter Malkin

Peter L. Malkin is Chairman Emeritus of Empire State Realty Trust. In 1958 he joined Lawrence A. Wien and together they led the ownership  and operation of properties in 6 states, including the Empire State Building and several other major office buildings in New York City. He is the founding chair of The Grand Central Partnership, the 34th Street Partnership and the Fashion Center, not-for profit Business Improvement Districts that provide supplemental services, including public safety, sanitation, and streetscape enhancements to midtown Manhattan, and founder of The Merritt Parkway Conservancy and the Urban League of Fairfield County, CT. Malkin is also Co-Chairman of the Emeritus Board of Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts (having been the longest serving board member of that institution), Chairman of the Dean’s Council of the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University, Co-Chair Emeritus of the Real Estate Council of the Metropolitan Museum of New York, co-founder with Paul Newman and Co-Chair Emeritus of the Committee Encouraging Corporate Philanthropy, a Director Emeritus of U.S. Trust Corporation, a Trustee Emeritus of the National Trust for Historic Preservation, a member of the Advisory Committee of the Greenwich Japanese School, a partner in the New York City Partnership and Chamber of Commerce and a director of the Realty Foundation of New York. Peter L. Malkin received a bachelor’s degree summa cum laude, Phi Beta Kappa, from Harvard College and a law degree magna cum laude from Harvard Law School.


Jacob Mchangama

Jacob Mchangama

Jacob is the director of Justitia, a Danish judicial think tank devoted to human rights, fundamental freedom rights, and the rule of law. Prior to his work at Justicia, Jacob served as the director of legal affairs at the Center for Political Studies, where he focused on advocacy and academic research in the fields of human rights with a specific focus on freedom of expression. He is also an external lecturer in international human rights law at the University of Copenhagen. He has published numerous articles in academic journals as well as in international newspapers such as The Wall Street Journal Europe, Globe and Mail, National Review, Reason, The Australian, South China Morning Post, Jerusalem Post, Hürriet Daily News, Voice of Russia, China Post, and Daily News (Egypt).  His work has been mentioned in international media including The Economist, Courrier International and CBS.com. He is a frequent commentator for Danish TV and radio.  In 2010 he was voted the most influential Danish public intellectual under the age of 40 by Danish newspaper Politiken.


Muriel Morisey

Muriel Morisey

Muriel Morisey is Associate Professor of Law, Emerita, at the Beasley School of Law at Temple University. Professor Morisey has also served as Legislative Counsel of the ACLU and at the United States Department of Justice Civil Rights Division. While earning her J.D. from Georgetown University Law Center, Professor Morisey held senior staff positions with then-United States Representatives Walter Fauntroy and the late Shirley Chisholm. Professor Morisey also served on the staff of the House Judiciary Committee’s impeachment investigation of President Richard Nixon. Professor Morisey has been extensively involved in the work of educational and other nonprofit organizations throughout her career. She has served on the National Board of the American Civil Liberties Union and the boards of the ACLU Philadelphia Chapter, the Pennsylvania affiliate, and the Massachusetts affiliate. Professor Morisey is also a former Trustee of Radcliffe College (her alma mater) and, prior to joining the Temple Law faculty, she was a member of the Harvard University Graduate School of Education faculty and Director of Policy Analysis in the University’s Office of Government, Community and Public Affairs.


Steven Pinker

Steven Pinker

Steven Pinker is an experimental psychologist and one of the world’s foremost writers on language, mind, and human nature. Currently Johnstone Family Professor of Psychology at Harvard University, Pinker has also taught at Stanford and MIT. His research on vision, language, and social relations has won prizes from the National Academy of Sciences, the Royal Institution of Great Britain, the Cognitive Neuroscience Society, and the American Psychological Association. He has also received eight honorary doctorates, several teaching awards at MIT and Harvard, and numerous prizes for his books The Language Instinct, How the Mind Works, The Blank Slate, and The Better Angels of Our Nature. He is Chair of the Usage Panel of the American Heritage Dictionary, and often writes for The New York Times, Time, and other publications. He has been named Humanist of the Year, Prospect magazine’s “The World’s Top 100 Public Intellectuals,” Foreign Policy’s “100 Global Thinkers,” and Time magazine’s “The 100 Most Influential People in the World Today.”


Steven Shapiro

Steven Shapiro

Steven Shapiro is currently Portfolio Manager at Intrepid Family Office LLC in Greenwich, Connecticut. He previously founded and managed a $2 Billion technology-oriented hedge fund. Prior to that he served in a variety of finance positions including Tiger Management LLC in New York City and Fidelity Investments in Boston.

He earned his MBA from the Wharton School of Business and his BA in Political Science and Economics from Oberlin College. He also served on the Board of Directors at Oberlin from 2007 to 2013.

In his free time, Steven serves on the Board and Executive Committee of the Bronx Museum of the Arts.


Daniel Shuchman

Daniel Shuchman

Daniel Shuchman was a board member of FIRE from 2007-18, and Chairman of the Board from 2016-18. He has managed private and public investment funds at MSD Capital, L.P., in New York since 2002. Previously, he worked at Gotham Partners, L.P., and Goldman Sachs & Co.

Daniel is the co-founder, with Jonathan Haidt and Lenore Skenazy, of Let Grow, a nonprofit group promoting greater independence and resiliency for America’s kids. He has written on free speech and other issues for The Wall Street Journal, Reason, Forbes, Real Clear Markets, Commentary and other publications.

Daniel is a graduate of the Horace Mann School in New York and the University of Pennsylvania, where he studied history and philosophy.

He is married to Lori E. Lesser, an intellectual property attorney, and has a son and a daughter.


Nadine Strossen

Nadine Strossen

New York Law School Professor Emerita Nadine Strossen, past national President of the American Civil Liberties Union (1991-2008), is a leading expert and frequent speaker/media commentator on constitutional law and civil liberties, who has testified before Congress on multiple occasions. She serves on the advisory boards of the ACLU, Foundation for Individual Rights and Expression (FIRE), Heterodox Academy, and National Coalition Against Censorship, and is a Founding Member of the new Academic Freedom Alliance (launched in March, 2021). The National Law Journal has named Strossen one of America’s “100 Most Influential Lawyers.” Her 2018 book HATE: Why We Should Resist It with Free Speech, Not Censorship was selected by Washington University as its 2019 “Common Read.”


Lawrence Summers

Lawrence Summers

Lawrence H. Summers is the Charles W. Eliot University Professor and President Emeritus of Harvard University. During the past two decades, he has served in a series of senior policy positions in Washington, D.C., including the 71st Secretary of the Treasury for President Clinton, Director of the National Economic Council for President Obama and Vice President of Development Economics and Chief Economist of the World Bank.

He received a bachelor of science degree from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1975 and was awarded a Ph.D. from Harvard in 1982. In 1983, he became one of the youngest individuals in recent history to be named as a tenured member of the Harvard University faculty. In 1987, Mr. Summers became the first social scientist ever to receive the annual Alan T. Waterman Award of the National Science Foundation (NSF), and in 1993 he was awarded the John Bates Clark Medal, given every two years to the outstanding American economist under the age of 40.

He is currently the Charles W. Eliot University Professor at Harvard University and the Weil Director of the Mossavar-Rahmani Center for Business & Government at Harvard’s Kennedy School. He and his wife Elisa New, a professor of English at Harvard, reside in Brookline with their six children.